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Pattern Brush with Artboard 2

Quick Tip: Create a Pattern Brush

This video shows how to make a patterned brush style using simple graphics and the ’Path Decorator’ settings.

Artboard 2 collection Material color swatches

12 Custom Color Palettes for MacOS

When considering a new color scheme for your next design project, custom color palettes are a great place to start. Using Apple’s Color Picker, you can manually create new color swatch lists, or download and install pre-made custom color palettes from several sources on the web. Here’s how…

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Boundaries Map Styles Included with Ortelius for Mac

Map Boundary Styles Included with Ortelius

Ortelius includes numerous pre-designed map boundary styles, such as community, county, parish, state, national, park, forest boundary lines and more. To edit built-in styles, Clone a style and customize it to suit your project.  These are just some of the styles & clip art among a wide assortment of over 1700 fully editable vector map symbols and custom styles included in the built-in Ortelius Library.

To Get This Collection

This collection is included with the Ortelius software for Mac OS X. Don’t have Ortelius? Try it free!

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

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The Library Manager

The Library Manager operates behind the scenes. It’s where all styles and symbols are organized into collections and categories.

The Library Manager uses an interface which is very similar to other applications such as Finder and iTunes(TM), and this familiarity should make it quick and easy to learn and use. Similar to the Styles & Symbols palette, items can be dragged directly from the Library Manager to your drawing canvas.

The Library Manager’s left sidebar lists the collections and categories, and its main window displays items an icon view or list view. The Library Manager view is customizable.

To Open the Library Manager:

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Do one of the following:

  • Choose Window > Library Manager from the main menu.
  • Add the Library Manager to the toolbar by customizing the toolbar.

Available Libraries:

The Library Manager contains two libraries – the Mapdiva Library and the user’s ‘My Library’. Each library may contain one or more collections.

  • The Mapdiva Library contains a Built-In Collection with hundreds of styles and symbols ready for making your next masterpiece. Items in this library cannot be modified, though they can be reorganized into various categories and subcategories, and also copied (cloned) to My Library for further customization.
  • ‘My Library’ is the location of user created collections. Organize your styles and symbols into categories as desired.

To Save Custom Styles to My Library:

  1. Open the Style Inspector.
  2. Create a new style.
  3. Name the style and provide an optional description.
  4. Click the “Add to User Collection…” button. The saved items are managed in the Library Manager under “My Library” and can be renamed, categorized, locked/unlocked, and more.

See Using the Style Inspector for more information about saving styles through the Style Inspector.

To Save Your Own Custom Symbols to the Library Manager:

Any graphic you draw can be saved as your own symbols in Ortelius. If your graphic is made up of two or more objects, those objects must be grouped if it is to be saved as a single symbol. Saved items are managed in the Library Manager under “My Library” and can be renamed, categorized, locked for editing, and more.

  1. Create your graphic(s) and group the objects as necessary.
  2. Select one or more separate graphics (each separate object or group will be added as an individual symbol).
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Graphic > Save Symbol to Library… from the main menu.
  • If available, click the Add Symbol icon from the toolbar (note, the Add Symbol icon can be added to the toolbar by customizing the toolbar).
  • Use the CMND-Y keyboard shortcut.

4. In the symbol’s Save As dialog, you have the option to name your symbol, add an optional description, make symbols auto-detach from their symbol master when placed (treat as standard graphics rather than symbols), sequnceable, locked, and scale. If adding multiple symbols, you can cycle through these settings for each symbol at this time.
5. Click ‘Done’. The symbol(s) are available immediately under “My Library” from the Styles & Symbols Palette.

HINT: To access the symbol Save As dialog later, right-click a symbol in the Library Manager and choose ‘Edit…’ from the contextual menu.

Related Topic: Creating New Symbols

To Make Items Editable or Not Editable:

Do one of the following:

  • Right-click the item and choose ‘Editable’ (or ‘Not Editable’) from the contextual menu.
  • From within the List view, click the icon to the right of the item name to toggle between ‘Editable’ or ‘Not Editable’.
  • Within the Icon view, double-click a style to open it in the Style Inspector. Change the Editable status from within the Style Inspector.

To Rename User Styles and Symbols:

Items must be editable (unlocked) in order to receive changes. Do one of the following:

  • Right-click a symbol or style in the Library Manager and choose ‘Rename’ from the contextual menu. The item name will be highlighted for editing. Type to rename it.
  • Double-click the name of the item in the Library Manager. Type to rename it.

HINT: Items in the built-in Mapdiva Library cannot be renamed.

To Move or Copy Items:

  1. Drag-and-drop to move items between collections and categories.
  2. To copy an item from one collection to another, hold the Option-key while dragging the item.

HINT: Dragging from the Mapdiva Library to your own collection will copy the item rather than move it.

To Delete Items:

To permanently remove an item from the User Library,

  1. Select the item(s) and right-click.
  2. Choose “Delete…” from the contextual menu.

HINT: Items must be ‘Editable’ to be deleted. Items in the built-in Mapdiva Library cannot be deleted.

To Manage Categories:

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Categories keep your styles and symbols organized and easy to find. You can freely add categories to organize the collections, and categories can be divided into subcategories.

  • Adding a New Category – Click the ‘+’ button or choose “New Category” in the Action Menu (looks like a gear). A new “untitled category” is added to the active collection (or, if you have selected a category, a new subcategory (child) of the selected category is added). Type a name for the category. A category can be renamed at any time by double-clicking its name and typing a new one. Category names must be unique within a collection.
  • Deleting Categories – Select the category and click the ‘-‘ button or choose “Delete Category…”. Deleting a category does not delete the styles and symbols it contains – items remain available in the “All Items” category unless intentionally deleted – but they may be harder to find later. This operation cannot be undone.
  • Adding Items to Categories – Individual styles and symbols can belong to one or more category. Items are organized into categories using drag-and-drop. Simply select the “All Items” category to show the content of the library, then drag items (shift-click to select multiple items) to the desired category in the left-hand list. To nest and unnest categories, just drag-and-drop the category where you want it.
  • Removing Items from Categories – Select the items, right-click and choose “Remove From Category” from the contextual menu. Alternatively, select the category and drag items out of the window to some empty space. Removing an item from a category does not delete it from its collection – it will remain available in the “All Items” category unless intentionally deleted. Items can’t be removed from or directly added to any of the automatically managed categories, such as “All Items.”

To Use Smart Categories:

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In addition to normal categories, a special type of category exists called a “Smart Category.” Smart Categories are shown having a purple-colored icon.

Smart Categories work by filtering the entire collection based on a set of criteria you establish. As such, their content is dynamic and will change automatically as items are added, removed and edited. Smart Categories are similar to Smart Folders and Smart Playlists feature in applications such as Finder and iTunes(TM).

  • To Add a New Smart Category – Select the collection to add it to and choose New Smart Category… from the Action Menu. The criteria editor is opened ready to edit the category. You can build up the desired filter by combining different criteria as you wish; click ‘+’ to add a new criteria to the query, ‘-‘ to remove a criteria. You can also limit the content to a fixed number of results if you wish. Click ‘Save’ to establish the Smart Category which will immediately display the content matching the query. Double-click the name or right-click and choose “Rename” from the contextual menu to change a Smart Category’s name.
  • Editing Smart Categories – Smart Categories are not directly editable in that you can’t drag items into or out of them, but you can edit the filter criteria. To edit the filter criteria, select the category and choose “Edit Smart Category…” from the Action Menu. The criteria editor is opened ready to edit the category.
  • Deleting Smart Categories – Select the category and click the ‘-‘ button or choose “Delete Category…”. Deleting a category does not delete the styles and clipart it contains – items remain available in the “All Items” category unless intentionally deleted. This operation cannot be undone.

To Get More Information on Styles and Symbols:

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  1. Click the “Get Info” icon in the Library Manager Toolbar.

A drawer slides out and displays information about the selected style or symbol. This information includes the name, description, and other item metadata. Use the information panel to edit the name and description of your User Library items.

To Import a Collection:

If you receive a collection from another user (or from Mapdiva), do one of the following:

  • In Finder, unzip the file (as needed), then in the Library Manager choose “Import Collection…” from the Action Menu (looks like a gear). The collection will be imported into My Library and displayed.
  • In Finder, unzip the file (as needed), then double-click the collection file. The Ortelius Library Manager will launch and collection will be automatically imported into My Library.

To Export a Collection:

Export from My Library to create a zip file on disk of the entire collection, allowing you to backup and share it with other users.

  1. Select the desired collection to export.
  2. Choose “Export Collection…” from the Library Manager – Action Menu (looks like a gear).

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Create Scrapbook Styles for Fun Spring-time Graphics

A scrapbook style is characterized by a wide outline around your graphic in the color of paper – as if the graphic were cut out by scissors. The key to this style is adding a wide stroke to show underneath the shape’s silhouette. Artboard’s advanced Style Inspector makes easy work of these fun scrapbook styles.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard for Mac OS X
Difficulty: Intermediate
Topics Covered: Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: 15 minutes

Step 1

Open a new drawing. We’ve changed our drawing units to points’ in the File > Drawing Size & Units… dialog. For this tutorial we are demonstrating using a graphic we’ve already drawn – a silhouette of a pigeon. Start by drawing your own shape or using a simple clip art (silhouette/outline shapes work best) in the built-in library. Even a simple circle or square will work to let you step through this tutorial.

Step 2

Open the Style Inspector. With the object selected, click “Reset” to create a new style. Change the fill color to a creamy off-white paper color (we’ve used RGB-251,248,229). Change the stroke color to a medium grey. Click the “+” button in the Style Inspector to add another stroke; change the width to about 14-pts and make it the same color as the off-while fill; check the box to add a shadow. Now, make sure this new stroke is at the top of the style components list – as needed, you can click onto the “Stroke” name in the style component list and drag to move it. Items at the top of the list are drawn first, therefore the wide stroke will appear under the other fill and stroke in your drawing.

This is a nice scrapbook look already – you could stop here. We’re going to enhance the look by adding some wavy line texture to the style.

TRY IT NOW! Download the Artboard resource file for this tutorial.

Step 3

With the shape still selected, click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Hatch Fill” style component. Play with the settings to get the look you’re after. We’ve made the line width about 4.5-pts, used a nice blue color with partial transparency, and added some roughness and wobble to the lines.

Step 4

Follow step 3 above to add a second Hatch Fill using another color. We’ve made ours a nice semi-transparent green with different line width, spacing, roughness and wobble. The key isn’t trying to copy exactly how we’ve done it, but to play with the settings so you get a feel for what is possible.

Final Image

Congratulations! You’ve created a fun scrapbook style. Use the Style Dropper to apply this style to other graphics for instant gratification ;) or save it to your library for future use. Make variations of the style by clicking “Clone” in the Style Inspector and removing the hatch fills, adding new colors, and more. Enjoy the awesomeness – here are some free eggs for your basket.

Your pigeon dressed up with a cheery pink background – ready for spring!

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Create Hauntingly Beautiful Art Text in Artboard

Any text in Artboard can be converted into a shape and custom styled to great effect. We show you how to use Artboard’s Core Image Filters applied to a style to create this hauntingly beautiful art text effect.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.7+ for Mac OS X
Difficulty: Intermediate to Advanced
Topics Covered: Style Inspector; Core Image Filters; Converting Text to Shape Group
Estimated Completion Time: ~20 minutes

Step 1

Open a new drawing.

Draw a large text box with the Text Box[t] tool. Return to the Select[s] tool, double-click the text box and type “ARTBOARD”. This is a good place to mention that in Artboard you can automatically change the case of your text. For example, select the text box and choose Text > Change Case > To Lower from the main menu. Note how your text changes instantaneously to all lower-case. We are using “Moltors” font that is only upper-case so it doesn’t matter in our example, but now you know how to do it!

Speaking of fonts, with the text box still selected, open the Font panel and choose a nice fat font (e.g., Moltors) and adjust the size. Our example uses 96pt for a large text block, but you can adjust the text to fit your purpose. As needed, use the Select[s] tool to grab the text box sizing handles and adjust its size. Close the Font panel.

Prefer doing things hands-on? Give it a try…

 

Step 2

In the next step we convert our text to a shape so we can style it. We could simply convert the text to a single shape (once you do that the text will no longer be editable) using Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu (or right click and choose Convert To > Shape). However, I want to flip the “R” to make our graphic text extra fancy, so each letter needs to be a separate shape. To do so, choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape Group from the main menu (or right click and choose Convert To > Shape Group). Then, ungroup the shape.

Step 3

With the Select[s] tool, select the first “R” and choose Graphic > Flip > Horizontally from the main menu. You may want to adjust the letter’s position after flipping to maintain nice spacing between letters. Now, select all the letters and choose Graphic > Combine > Append from the main menu, or click the “Append” icon if you’ve added it to your toolbar. Appending the shapes together allows us to apply a style across the shape as a whole.

Step 4

Use the Select[s] tool to select the text shape and open the Style Inspector. With the text shape still selected, click “Reset” to create a new style from scratch. Click onto “Fill” in the components list then click the “-” button to remove the component. Repeat to remove the “Stroke” style component. Next, click the “+” button and add “Core Image Filter” style component. The core image filter is a group, so we’ll need to add one or more components under the group (we’re adding an image). Click the “+” and add “Image” to add an image adornment. You may need to click the little triangle next to “Core Image Filter Group” in the components list to expand it and see what’s inside the group.

Click onto the “Image Adornment” to open its properties. Click the “Image File…” button to choose an image that will be used as the fill. You can use any image here – experiment to see what works best for your needs. In this example, we’re using a lovely floral pattern we downloaded from freedesign4.me.

Step 5

Let’s turn our attention back to the Core Image Filter Group. Click on it in the style components list. From the drop-down, choose the “Gloom” filter. Keep the standard settings – with “Clipping” set to “Inside path”. The effect will automatically be applied to the image in the filter group. If the image is smaller (or undesirably bigger) than the text shape, you can return to the Image Adornment and adjust the scale of the image.

Step 6

Finally, let’s add a background object to our final image. Use the Rectangle[r] tool with the “Licorice – fill” style from the Basic Strokes & Fills category in the built-in collection. Draw a large rectangle. With the rectangle selected, choose Graphic > Send To Back from the main menu (or right click and choose Arrange > Send To Back). That’s it!

Final Image

From here, you may want to copy your shape to try different background photos. With the copy selected, click “Clone” in the Style Inspector. Now you can simply go to the Image Adornment style component and choose a new image file. To save any of your styles to the User Library, click “Style” at the top of the Style Components list and name and save the style to your collections. Here is our final image, along with a variation using an old family photo for the image adornment. Do you think it would look good over a patterned background?

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How to Create Swirling Paths of Bubbles in Artboard

Artboard gives you the power to create advanced styles that go way beyond simple fill and stroke. Here we show a simple way to create paths of bubbles for using under water or to float through the air. Read more

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Surprisingly Easy Stitched Style Icons in Artboard

We all love icons, especially when they are so simple to make! Find out how to make this icon using Artboard’s powerful stacked styles and two simple shapes.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.x+ for Mac OS X
Difficulty: Intermediate
Topics Covered: Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: ~15 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

Open a new drawing. With the Round Rectangle tool, hold the SHIFT-ket and draw a rectangle about 5-cm x 5-cm square (it will be different if you are using a different drawing units). Holding the SHIFT-ket constrains the aspect ratio to make a perfect square. As needed, you can adjust the size in the Geometry pane.

Step 2

Use the Select[s] tool to select the square and open the Style Inspector – Expert pane. (EDIT: As of Artboard 1.3 the “Simple” and “Expert” buttons have been removed from the Style Inspector (it edits all expert styles by default).) With the shape shape still selected, click “New” to create a new style from scratch. Click onto “Fill” in the components list then click the “-” button to remove the component. Click onto the remaining “Stroke” in the style components list. Click the color-well to change it to a light grey color (we’ve used RGB 206,206,206). Adjust the line width to about .6-cm and check to add a shadow. Adjust the shadow as desired.

Step 3

With the shape still selected, click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Gradient Fill” style component. Click onto the gradient slider color-wells to change the colors to a red and dark red color (we’ve used RGB 218,36,24 and 130,22,15 respectively). In the gradient-well, hold the SHIFT-key and move the rotation handle so the gradient angle is 90-degrees (holding the SHIFT-key constrains the angle to 15-degree increments).

Step 4

Next, we’ll add some stitching. Click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Stroke” style component. Click onto the color-well to change the color to a light brown color (we’ve used RGB 127,124,88). Adjust the line width as needed to about .035-cm. To make the line dashed, choose the long-dash from the dash drop-down list. Adjust the offset slider to about -.2cm (you may need to make this a positive number depending on the direction you drew the square). Click the “Transform” button and set the “Y Offset” to .02-cm.

Step 5

Add a second lighter dashed line to give the stitching some depth. Click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Stroke” style component. Click onto the color-well to change the color to a light yellow color (we’ve used RGB 255,247,176). Adjust the line width as needed to about .035-cm. To make the line dashed, choose the long-dash from the dash drop-down list. Adjust the offset to about -.2-cm.

Nice job. We’re nearly finished already!

Step 6

Next we’ll add a nice shape to sit on top of our square background. From the Styles & Clip Art palette, drag a shape onto your drawing canvas. We’ve used a heart from the “Shapes” category. Adjust the size by holding the SHIFT-key and dragging the object handles. Drag to position over your square. As needed, use Graphic > Align >… in the main menu to precisely align the shapes.

Step 7

With the top object selected, click “New” in the Style Inspector – Expert pane. Click onto “Stroke” in the style components list and click “-” to remove it. Click onto “Fill” in the style component list and change the color to a dark gray (we’ve used RGB 74,74,74). Click onto the “Transform” button and set the “Y Offset” to .05-cm. The offset will give this top shape just a subtle bit of depth.

Step 8

Click the “+” button and add a Gradient fill. Make the first color stop white and the second one a light grey (we’ve used RGB 255,255,255 and 204,204,204 respectively. Rotate the knob in the gradient-well to 90-degrees.

Step 9

Finally, we’ll add some light stitching to this shape. Click the “+” and add a stroke style component. Change the color to a medium grey (we’ve used RGB 128,128,128). Set the line width to about .03-cm and choose a long dash from the dash drop-down list. Adjust the line offset to about .117cm (note, depending on the shape you are using, you may need to make the offset a negative number).

Final Image

Congratulations! With only two shapes and the use of Artboard’s powerful stacked styles, you’ve created a handsome stitched style icon. As desired, you can save the styles to My Collection in the Library Manager for later re-use. Use the Style Dropper to quickly apply the styles to a wide variety of shapes and create an array of unique icons. You can also group the shapes then choose Edit > Add Clip Art To Library to save as clip art for later re-use.

Here we’ve applied our style to text that was converted to shape, and to a few other shapes in the built-in clip art Library. Have fun exploring with your own colors and shapes. We’d love to see what you come up with!

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Make a Bold Statement with Patterns

Patterns can add punch to your design, and in Artboard there are several ways you can make a statement. Here we see two simple methods using the Style Inspector to create patterns instantly.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.1+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Beginner – Intermediate
Topics Covered: Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: 10 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

This is a pretty quick and easy tutorial showing how to make pattern fills with Artboard’s Style Inspector. In fact, the longest part may be the time it takes to make your graphic for the pattern. Here we are drawing a target-circle pattern. You can make a repeatable pattern from any graphic – even images. Just keep in mind, very small and closely spaced patterns start using a lot of memory and may slow things down a bit.

With a “New” style and the Oval [o] tool, start by drawing a circle. Hold the SHIFT-key while drawing to maintain its aspect ratio. We sized the circle to 10-cm in the Geometry plane.

Step 2

With the Select [s] tool, use the quick-copy keyboard shortcut to make several copies pasted in place. Hold the Alt/Option-key and click the circle once to make your first duplicate of it. With the new circle still selected (it won’t look differently from your first circle since it is a copy pasted in place), change the size to 9-cm in the Geometry pane. Click the circle again with the Alt/Option-key and make another duplicate, resizing this one to 8-cm. Repeat this eight times until the inner circle is 3-cm. You now have your objects for your target-circle graphic.

Step 3

Next we’ll drag and drop some colors onto our graphic. You could apply any new style to the circles. Since we are using basic fill styles, we can drag a color onto each circle and a new ad hoc style is created. We’re making our target “Lead” black and a creamy white.

Step 4

Although the graphic is ready to-go, in this example I’m making my pattern a bit smaller so I’ve selected the objects, grouped and resized the graphic while holding the SHIFT-key to maintain its aspect ratio. We’ll use this smaller graphic in our patterns. Make a copy of the graphic by selecting the smaller graphic and choose Edit > Copy from the main menu, or use the CMND-C keyboard shortcut.

While you could make duplicates of your object and place them accordingly to lay out your pattern, you can make instant repeatable patterns using the Style Inspector. In the steps below, we are going to show you two different ways to create repeating patterns in Artboard.

Step 5

In the layers panel, click the “+” button to add a new layer. Draw a large rectangle using the Rectangle [r] tool. With the rectangle still selected, open the Style Inspector and click “New” to create a new style.

In the Style Inspector, click onto the “Fill” style component and click “Paste Image”. Your graphic (that you copied to the clipboard in the previous step) will be pasted into the image-well and used as a repeatable pattern in the new style. The underlying image is anchored to the drawing canvas and is tiled seamlessly across the page. When you move the shape around, the image pattern remains stationary. This is the most efficient way to add an image to a style and works particularly well with repeating seamless image pattern tiles.

Step 6

The fill style component (above) is the most efficient repeating pattern, but lacks the ability to fine tune the pattern design. In this next example, we’ll add a Pattern Fill style component.

First, un-check the “Fill” style component in the list since we are no longer using it. Click the “+” button to select Pattern Fill from the drop-down list. Click “Paste Image” to add your graphic to the image-well. In the Pattern Fill, we can adjust many settings. Type  “-1.5cm” into the Spacing dialog box to create a closely spaced overlapping pattern; we’ve kept a 50% alternating offset, and changed the angle of the pattern to 45-degrees.

Several options are available for image scale, spacing, offset, and angle, as well as some very cool options for randomness. Play with your settings based on the effect you are seeking. The underlying image fill is tied to (and will move with) the shape object. Pattern Fill provides the most flexibility for creating regular repeating and random image patterns.

Final Image

Congratulations! You now know two methods of creating regular repeating patterns using Artboard’s powerful Style Inspector. Now you can add your pattern to your drawing, and optionally name and save it to your user library for future use. To save the style, click onto “Style” at the top of the style components list to return to the style main interface, name your style and click the Enter-key, then click the bottom button to “Add To … Collection.”

We’ve finished our final image by turning off the layer holding our original graphics and adding some additional objects to add the “artboard” banner.

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Editing Artboard’s Extensive Clip Art Collection

Artboard delivers with hundreds of vector clip arts in a Library packed with shapes, graphics, and styles. In fact, all clip art except country flags are fully editable. Find out how to make the most of Artboard’s clip art library and make them your own.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.1+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Beginner
Topics Covered: Clip Art
Estimated Completion Time: 10 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

Open the Styles & Clip Art palette. As desired, click the Library icon in the palette toolbar to navigate through the categories of clip arts and styles. Here we are choosing the “Christmas Tree” clip art in the “Holidays & Occasions” category. Click onto the clip art you want to use and place it with Clip Art Stamp [y] tool, or simply drag the clip art from the palette onto your drawing.

To resize any clip art graphic, use the Select [s] tool and drag one of the object handles. Hold the SHIFT-key to maintain the aspect ratio while you drag.

Step 2

Many clip arts in the Artboard library are actually complex graphics made up of multiple objects (some are simple graphics made from a single shape and won’t need ungrouped). With the clip art selected, you will see “Group” listed as the object type in the Geometry panel. Choose Graphic > Ungroup from the main menu. You can see after ungrouping that the star, tree, the tree’s shading, tree trunk, and ornaments are all separate objects.

Step 3

Here we’ve selected the main body of the tree and open the Style Inspector. Click “Clone” to make a copy of the existing style, then click the color-well to change the fill color to blue.

Next, select one of the ornaments. You can see that the ornament is also a group – some complex clip arts may be made from groups of groups! Select each ornament and choose Graphic > Ungroup from the main menu, or right-click and choose Ungroup from the contextual menu.

Step 4

We’ve selected the main circle shape in the ungrouped ornament. In the Style Inspector, click “Clone” and change the colors in the gradient. Click onto the first gradient slider color-well and choose a white color. Click onto the second gradient slider color-well and choose a blue color.

Next, use the Style Dropper [d] tool to pick-up the new gradient style and drop it onto the other ornaments.

Step 5

We’ve also selected the star and made it a bit smaller. Hold the SHIFT-key while dragging the star’s object handles to maintain its aspect ratio while re-sizing.

Optionally, create a new clip art of the graphic that you’ve changed. With the Select [s] tool, click and drag a box over all the graphics to select the objects. Choose Graphic > Group from the main menu to group them into one graphic.

Step 6

Choose Edit > Add Clip Art To Library to automatically create a clip art in the user’s Library.

Final Image

Congratulations! You’ve successfully added a clip art to your drawing, ungrouped and edited it. Now you know the basics to edit any clip art supplied with Artboard. Use your customized artwork with other graphics to finish your drawing. Here we’ve added a rectangle with a gradient in the background, added “Snowflakes” clip art scattered on top, and some text. Thanks for a great first year with Artboard!