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Artboard 2 collection Material color swatches

Material Color Swatch Styles Included with Artboard 2

Styles define the look of your shapes. The built-in collection includes special color swatch styles based on Google’s Material Color Swatches. Select a style in the Styles & Clip Art palette and begin drawing, or drag styles from the palette onto existing objects.

Alternatively, use built-in styles as inspiration to create your own unique styles in Artboard’s expert Style Inspector. Choose a style and open the Style Inspector, then click ‘Clone’ to make a copy without affecting the original. Make desired changes to it, and continue drawing.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

Artboard 2 collection brushes pens markers

Brushes, Pens & Marker Strokes Included with Artboard 2

Styles define the look of your shapes and paths – and Artboard goes way beyond simple fill and stroke. The built-in collection includes special line styles that use arrowed strokes, path decorators, tagged strokes, offset strokes, and more. Select a style in the Styles & Clip Art palette and begin drawing, or drag styles from the palette onto existing path objects.

Alternatively, use built-in styles as inspiration to create your own unique styles in Artboard’s expert Style Inspector. Choose a style and open the Style Inspector, then click ‘Clone’ to make a copy without affecting the original. Make desired changes to it, and continue drawing.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media (e.g., templates, clip art, styles and symbols) provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. This allows licensees of Mapdiva software to reuse those media for integration within their own work, both personal and commercial; however, Mapdiva reserves fully and unconditionally all trademark, branding and redistribution rights associated with the original media. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

Artboard 2 collection Color Brewer diverging colors

Color Swatch Styles Included with Artboard 2

Styles define the look of your shapes. The built-in collection includes special color swatch styles based on a full selection of complimentary, diverging, qualitative and quantitative ColorBrewer color ramps. Select a style in the Styles & Clip Art palette and begin drawing, or drag styles from the palette onto existing path objects.

Alternatively, use built-in styles as inspiration to create your own unique styles in Artboard’s expert Style Inspector. Choose a style and open the Style Inspector, then click ‘Clone’ to make a copy without affecting the original. Make desired changes to it, and continue drawing.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media (e.g., templates, clip art, styles and symbols) provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. This allows licensees of Mapdiva software to reuse those media for integration within their own work, both personal and commercial; however, Mapdiva reserves fully and unconditionally all trademark, branding and redistribution rights associated with the original media. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

Artboard 2 collection basic strokes fills

Basic Strokes & Fills Included with Artboard 2

Styles define the look of your shapes and paths. Though Artboard goes way beyond simple fill and stroke, we include them too. The built-in collection includes dozens of basic line and fill styles. Select a style in the Styles & Clip Art palette and begin drawing, or drag styles from the palette onto existing path objects.

Alternatively, use built-in styles as inspiration to create your own unique styles in Artboard’s expert Style Inspector. Choose a style and open the Style Inspector, then click ‘Clone’ to make a copy without affecting the original. Make desired changes to it, and continue drawing.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media (e.g., templates, clip art, styles and symbols) provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. This allows licensees of Mapdiva software to reuse those media for integration within their own work, both personal and commercial; however, Mapdiva reserves fully and unconditionally all trademark, branding and redistribution rights associated with the original media. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

Image crop with Artboard OS X

How To Clip Images with Complex Objects

Artboard makes it easy to clip your images with complex vector objects. Draw any shape and use the Intersect command. Here’s how.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.7+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Intermediate
Topics Covered: Image Browser and Intersect
Estimated Completion Time: about 15 minutes

Step 1 – Draw the Clipping Shape

Open the Image Browser and drag-and-drop from the Browser to your drawing canvas to place your image. Draw any shape – from a simple rounded rectangle to a complex outline of the area you want to clip. Here we’ve used the Bezier Path [b]tool to draw an outline around the girl in the picture. We used a simple red stroke with no fill to better see the outline as we traced over the picture.

Step 2 – Clip the Image

To clip the image with your shape, hold the Command-key and use the Select [s] tool to select both the image and the shape. Then click the Intersect icon on the Toolbar, or choose Graphic > Combine > Intersect from the main menu. Clipping images is non-destructive – an image that is clipped still has the original image hidden behind the clipped area, and the clipping path can be removed later as desired. Double-click the image to reposition it or scale it within its bounding box. An image effects panel is also displayed. If you want to remove the clipping path, right-click the image and choose “Remove Image clipping path” from the contextual menu.

Step 3 – Mask and Resample Image (optional)

An image with a clipping path can be permanently cropped to remove portions of the image that are hidden, thus reducing overall file size. Cropped images are resampled to the clipped area. To crop a clipped image, right-clicking the image and choose “Crop and resample image” from the contextual menu.

Final Image

Clipping images in Artboard is as easy as 1-2-3! We hope you enjoy the simplicity of how it works just like the Boolean operations with any vector objects.

Image Mask and Crop

Inspired Image Editing

We are as focused on improving existing features as we are creating new ones. This one is just for you. Artboard can now crop and mask using Boolean intersection of shapes; select, scale, and reposition images within a frame; adjust exposure, saturation, image effects, and more.  Read more

Royal Bakery: Inspiration vs. Perspiration

The Royal Bakery is sweet on Artboard Drawing Software

The Royal Bakery of Campbell, California creates custom cakes for any occasion in delicious gourmet and traditional flavors. Lesley Wright of The Royal Bakery recently began using Artboard to help communicate her cake designs with her customers.

“I get asked a lot what software I use for drawing my cake drafts,” Lesley relates her experience using Artboard, “It’s great! It’s simple enough for beginners but powerful enough to do exactly what I need!”  Lesley was kind enough to share some delicious screenshots of her Artboard graphics and the finished product, this gorgeous birthday cake.

Talking about drawing the inspiration cakes with Artboard, Lesley says “…it was so easy to recolor the original to offer different options to the customer!” Don’t they look yummy? Here is the absolutely amazing final result. Check out The Royal Bakery’s facebook page for more sweet inspiration, and if your in the Campbell, California area, look them up!

bubble-path-final

How to Create Swirling Paths of Bubbles in Artboard

Artboard gives you the power to create advanced styles that go way beyond simple fill and stroke. Here we show a simple way to create paths of bubbles for using under water or to float through the air. Read more

Artboard 2 collection speech bubbles

Speech & Thought Bubbles Included with Artboard 2

Choose from an assortment of speech and thought bubbles to use with your drawings and photos. Drag from the Styles & Clip Art palette onto your drawing, then double-click with the Select [s] tool and type your text. Since they are fully editable vector graphics, you can change  the text and also edit the shape, size and style.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media (e.g., templates, clip art, styles and symbols) provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. This allows licensees of Mapdiva software to reuse those media for integration within their own work, both personal and commercial; however, Mapdiva reserves fully and unconditionally all trademark, branding and redistribution rights associated with the original media. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

circlepattern-final

Make a Bold Statement with Patterns

Patterns can add punch to your design, and in Artboard there are several ways you can make a statement. Here we see two simple methods using the Style Inspector to create patterns instantly.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.1+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Beginner – Intermediate
Topics Covered: Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: 10 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

This is a pretty quick and easy tutorial showing how to make pattern fills with Artboard’s Style Inspector. In fact, the longest part may be the time it takes to make your graphic for the pattern. Here we are drawing a target-circle pattern. You can make a repeatable pattern from any graphic – even images. Just keep in mind, very small and closely spaced patterns start using a lot of memory and may slow things down a bit.

With a “New” style and the Oval [o] tool, start by drawing a circle. Hold the SHIFT-key while drawing to maintain its aspect ratio. We sized the circle to 10-cm in the Geometry plane.

Step 2

With the Select [s] tool, use the quick-copy keyboard shortcut to make several copies pasted in place. Hold the Alt/Option-key and click the circle once to make your first duplicate of it. With the new circle still selected (it won’t look differently from your first circle since it is a copy pasted in place), change the size to 9-cm in the Geometry pane. Click the circle again with the Alt/Option-key and make another duplicate, resizing this one to 8-cm. Repeat this eight times until the inner circle is 3-cm. You now have your objects for your target-circle graphic.

Step 3

Next we’ll drag and drop some colors onto our graphic. You could apply any new style to the circles. Since we are using basic fill styles, we can drag a color onto each circle and a new ad hoc style is created. We’re making our target “Lead” black and a creamy white.

Step 4

Although the graphic is ready to-go, in this example I’m making my pattern a bit smaller so I’ve selected the objects, grouped and resized the graphic while holding the SHIFT-key to maintain its aspect ratio. We’ll use this smaller graphic in our patterns. Make a copy of the graphic by selecting the smaller graphic and choose Edit > Copy from the main menu, or use the CMND-C keyboard shortcut.

While you could make duplicates of your object and place them accordingly to lay out your pattern, you can make instant repeatable patterns using the Style Inspector. In the steps below, we are going to show you two different ways to create repeating patterns in Artboard.

Step 5

In the layers panel, click the “+” button to add a new layer. Draw a large rectangle using the Rectangle [r] tool. With the rectangle still selected, open the Style Inspector and click “New” to create a new style.

In the Style Inspector, click onto the “Fill” style component and click “Paste Image”. Your graphic (that you copied to the clipboard in the previous step) will be pasted into the image-well and used as a repeatable pattern in the new style. The underlying image is anchored to the drawing canvas and is tiled seamlessly across the page. When you move the shape around, the image pattern remains stationary. This is the most efficient way to add an image to a style and works particularly well with repeating seamless image pattern tiles.

Step 6

The fill style component (above) is the most efficient repeating pattern, but lacks the ability to fine tune the pattern design. In this next example, we’ll add a Pattern Fill style component.

First, un-check the “Fill” style component in the list since we are no longer using it. Click the “+” button to select Pattern Fill from the drop-down list. Click “Paste Image” to add your graphic to the image-well. In the Pattern Fill, we can adjust many settings. Type  “-1.5cm” into the Spacing dialog box to create a closely spaced overlapping pattern; we’ve kept a 50% alternating offset, and changed the angle of the pattern to 45-degrees.

Several options are available for image scale, spacing, offset, and angle, as well as some very cool options for randomness. Play with your settings based on the effect you are seeking. The underlying image fill is tied to (and will move with) the shape object. Pattern Fill provides the most flexibility for creating regular repeating and random image patterns.

Final Image

Congratulations! You now know two methods of creating regular repeating patterns using Artboard’s powerful Style Inspector. Now you can add your pattern to your drawing, and optionally name and save it to your user library for future use. To save the style, click onto “Style” at the top of the style components list to return to the style main interface, name your style and click the Enter-key, then click the bottom button to “Add To … Collection.”

We’ve finished our final image by turning off the layer holding our original graphics and adding some additional objects to add the “artboard” banner.

nightmoon-final

Create a Tranquil Waxing Moon Scene in Artboard

Night scenes with dark foreground elements and wide sky backgrounds are easy to create in Artboard. Find out how to use radial gradients to create a waxing crescent moon, and Core Image Filter effects to create stars that really shine. Read more