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point-of-origin

Object Point of Origin

Artboard has many subtle methods for fine-tuning your work. One of these niceties is the point of origin, or center point, around which objects and symbols rotate and snap. Adjusting an object’s point of origin is simple and direct. Here’s how…

Point of Origin

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The point of origin of shapes, symbols, grouped objects, and images is represented with a blue “target” originally rendered at the center of the object. To change the point of origin, simply hold ⌘Command and grab onto the blue target and move it to any location within the object’s bounding box.

Drag the point of origin near the center of the object to snap it back into its original position.

Object Rotation Pivot Point

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The direct rotate knob is represented with a purple handle offset to the right of the object’s center. Simply grab the rotate knob and move to rotate the object. The rotation pivots around the object’s point of origin. To change the point of origin, simply hold the Command-key then grab it and move it to any location within the object’s bounding box. Object rotation will now pivot around the new point of origin.

Resetting the Bounding Box

After rotating an object, you can reset the bounding box to perpendicular and return the point of origin to the center of the object. Select the object and choose Graphic > Reset Bounding Box from the main menu. As expected, the object’s appearance does not change, just its bounding box.

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The Styles & Symbols Palette

Ortelius ships with an outstanding Library of over 1700 uniques styles and editable vector map symbols. Plus, any styles and graphics you create can be added to your user’s Library. These are accessible to you from the Styles & Symbols palette while you draw.

While styles and symbols are both present in the Styles & Symbols palette, the palette is smart about the type of tool you have active. Choose your tool, then choose a style to apply to that tool while it is active. Items that can be used with the active tool are enabled and highlighted, disabled items are subtly grayed-out. For example, when you draw a shape the stroke and fill styles are enabled. Symbols are enabled when the Stamp tool is being used. All styles and symbols are enabled while the Select tool is active.

To Open the Styles & Symbols Palette:

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Do one of the following:

  • Click the Styles & Symbols palette icon on the toolbar,.
  • Choose Window > Styles & Symbols palette from the main menu.

Recognizing How Items Look in the Palette:

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Ortelius delivers with hundreds of styles and symbol items combined together in the Ortelius Collection. Items are organized into categories accessible from the Library drop-down menu. You can tell an item’s type by its appearance in the palette:

  • Path styles are shown with a curved stroke
  • Fill styles are shown in a square
  • Symbols look just like their graphic

Hover your cursor over any item and its name and type (style or symbol) will appear in the tooltip.

HINT: When you place a symbol on your map, you are placing an instance of its master. To edit a symbol after you place it in your drawing, a symbol needs to be detached from its master (turning it into a regular drawing object) and may need ungrouped.

To Draw with Existing Styles:

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  1. Open the Styles & Symbols palette.
  2. Choose a drawing tool from the Tools palette.
  3. Choose a stroke or fill style from the Styles & Symbols palette (note, symbols will be visible but not selectable).
  4. Start drawing.
  5. Continue drawing (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).

To change styles, click once onto a different style in the Styles & Symbols palette and continue drawing.

To Browse Collections and Categories:

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  1. From the Styles & Symbols palette toolbar, choose the Library icon for a drop-down list of collections and categories.
  2. Use the forward and back buttons to navigate through previously visited categories.
  3. Search for styles and symbols from the search bar.

HINT: Search results are returned for the currently selected category. If you want to search the entire Collection, make sure “Ortelius Collection” is chosen from the drop-down menu.

To Apply a Different Library Style to an Existing Object:

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Do one of the following:

  • With the object selected, double-click a stroke or fill style from the Styles & Symbols palette.
  • Press the cursor onto a style from Styles & Symbols palette and drag it onto and existing object, release.

HINT: An alert pops up to confirm you intended the change. This alert can be turned off and reset in the Ortelius > Preferences… menu.

To Add Symbols to Your Map:

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Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Select [s] tool from the Tools palette then drag-and-drop symbols from the Styles & Symbols palette directly onto your drawing canvas (note, you can also drag symbols directly from the Library Manager).
  • Choose the Stamp [y] tool, choose a symbols from the palette then click one or more times onto the drawing canvas to place the clip (note, while the Stamp [y] tool is active, all symbols are enabled in the palette).

HINT: When you place a symbol on your map, you are placing an instance of its master.

To Resize a Symbol:

  1. Choose the the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Drag the lower right symbol sizing handle in the symbol bounding box.
  • Open the Object Inspector > Features pane and drag the scale slider.

To Replace One or More Symbols with a New Symbol:

Symbols are special objects associated with a master graphic. Unlike ordinary clip art, one or more symbols may be selected and easily replaced with a different symbol.

  1. Use the Select [s] tool to select the symbol(s) to be replaced.
  2. Double-click a new symbol in the Styles & Symbols palette.

To Edit Symbols:

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All symbols in the Mapdiva built-in collection, with the exception of country flags, are fully editable vector objects. Many symbols are made up of groups of objects which need ungrouped one or more times to edit them.

  1. Add a symbol(s) to your drawing.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and select the symbol(s)
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Right-click (single symbol) and choose ‘Detach From Symbol Master’ from the contextual menu.
  • Choose Edit > Symbol > Detach From Master from the main menu.

4. As needed (if the detached symbol is a group) ungroup the objects by doing one of the following:

  • Choose Graphic > Ungroup from the main menu (repeat as needed).
  • Right-click and choose Ungroup from the context menu.
  • Use the Shift-Command-G keyboard shortcut.

HINT: Some symbols may have groups within groups. Text may be edited within a group without ungrouping. Styles may by picked up with the Style Dropper tool without ungrouping.

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Ortelius 1.1 Introduces Professional Map Symbol Management

07.27.10 Indianapolis, Indiana – Today Mapdiva, LLC released Ortelius 1.1 map design software for Mac OS X. Ortelius 1.1 is a major update which introduces a professional-level symbol Library Manager and many workflow enhancements. This update is free for existing users.

Ortelius is a vector-based drawing program made especially for map design and presentation. Ortelius offers a creative solution for floor plans, landscape plans, scaled drawings, and a wide variety of high quality custom map graphics.

Experience a greatly improved approach to managing large collections of cartography symbols. With Ortelius 1.1, Mapdiva has paved the way to some exciting developments, including web-based cartography collections supplied by Mapdiva and shared by Ortelius users themselves. This update greatly enhances symbol management performance and work-flow flexibility.

Ortelius 1.1 enhancements include:

  • Quick application of new symbols with double-click action in Symbols Palette
  • Tightly integrated Symbols Palette and Library Manager
  • Improved navigation of Libraries and Collections
  • Symbol Library featuring flexible categories and smart categories
  • Enhanced JPG, PDF, PNG, TIFF, and export options
  • Advanced style & symbol views, including info with optional descriptions
  • Improved performance and workflow for style and symbol creation
  • Ability to copy layers among documents

Ortelius 1.1 ships with over 1700 built-in styles and symbols, including architecture, boundaries, land cover, transportation, trees and plants, water, and weather. Users can create the maps they want using the built-in Mapdiva Library, as well as create and share their very own symbol collections.

Features of Ortelius 1.1 Standard Edition:

  • Drag-and-drop interface
  • Dozens of fully editable vector map templates
  • Automatic junctions and style transitions
  • Direct intelligent labeling
  • WYSIWYG drawing and editing
  • Layers and layer groups
  • 20 special drawing and cartography tools
  • Advanced typography tools

Pricing and Availability:
Ortelius software is a dedicated map graphics program for Mac OS X. Ortelius Standard Edition is available for $99 (USD). A free trial download is available from Mapdiva online.

Release Notes: http://www.mapdiva.com/products/ortelius/md_update_110.htm
Download Ortelius: Ortelius Trial Version

About Mapdiva, LLC

Mapdiva makes mapping easier. Founded in 2008, Mapdiva, LLC offers creative mapping software for Mac OS. Mapdiva, LLC has offices in Indianapolis, IN USA and Armidale, NSW Australia. Ortelius is a Registered Trademark of Mapdiva, LLC.

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Creating New Symbols Without Starting From Scratch

Existing symbols can provide a great starting point for refining and creating new symbols. When a symbol is originally created, it is assigned as a "master" symbol which can be placed unlimited times on your map. Read more

point-of-origin

Object and Symbol Point of Origin

Ortelius has many subtle methods for fine-tuning your cartographic work. One of these niceties is the point of origin, or center point, around which objects and symbols rotate and snap. Adjusting an object’s point of origin is simple and direct. Here’s how…

Point of Origin

Point_of_Origin.png

The point of origin of shapes, symbols, grouped objects, and images is represented with a blue “target” originally rendered at the center of the object. To change the point of origin, simply hold the Command-key then grab onto the blue target and move it to any location within the object’s bounding box.

Object Rotation Pivot Point

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The direct rotate knob is represented with a purple handle offset to the right of the object’s center. Simply grab the rotate knob and move to rotate the object. The rotation pivots around the object’s point of origin. To change the point of origin, simply hold the Command-key then grab it and move it to any location within the object’s bounding box. Object rotation will now pivot around the new point of origin.

Resetting the Bounding Box

After rotating and/or adjusting the point of origin of an object, you can reset the bounding box to perpendicular and return the point of origin to the center of the object. Select the object and choose Graphic > Reset Bounding Box from the main menu. As expected, the object’s appearance does not change, just its bounding box.

Point of Origin on Symbol Adornments

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When symbols are created, they retain the point of origin of the original object on which they are based.

Symbols are placed on tracks as a “adornments,” and are snapped to the track at their point of origin. Typically a symbol is centered on the path with its central point of origin. In some circumstances, it may be useful to have a point of origin that is off-center. For example, for floor plans, doors are placed to show the door opening outward from a wall. When placing a door symbol (available in the Ortelius default symbol set) on a wall drawn with a track tool, a door must be offset to one side of the wall. If you look closely at a door symbol while it is not snapped onto a track, you will see this is accomplished with an off-center point of origin.

Before the symbol is created, adjust the point of origin. The symbol retains this point of origin. When snapped to a track, the symbol adornment is offset based on its point of origin. The side of the line the offset symbol appears on is based on the drawing direction of the track. The adornment can later be rotated by right-clicking it and choosing the desired rotation setting from the context menu.

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Tips for Static Text in Map Symbols

Sometimes static text (as opposed to dynamic text like route numbers) is an integral part of a symbol. These symbols may be re-scaled and shared for different purposes, such as placement in a legend and reuse at a different size within a brochure or book. For maximum scalability and consistency with complex symbols, convert text objects to shapes when creating a symbol. Your symbols will always look right, even when shared with people who don’t have the same fonts loaded on their system. Here’s how…

Complex Symbol Objects

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Map symbols in Ortelius can be composed of any combination of shapes, paths, graphics, and text. However, problems can occur when text objects within a group or symbol are re-scaled, or when a symbol is shared with a user who doesn’t have the same font loaded on their system. The solution is to convert the text to a shape after you are satisfied with the color, font, size, and style. In this way, the text will not change unexpectedly when scaled or if the symbol is used on another system or other vector editing program (such as Illustrator) without the proper font.

We’ll examine a fairly detailed symbol of a First Armored Division patch created by one of our customers. Color and grey-scale versions, and the original patch this symbol is modeled after, are shown.

Convert To Shape

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Select the text and choose Graphic > Convert To Shape in the main menu or from the right-click context menu. When the shape is grouped with the other objects and turned into a symbol it will scale properly. Shapes cannot be converted back to text objects. In this example, the text “Old Ironsides” and “1” would be converted to shape before creating the symbol.

Note that some symbols, such as road shields and sequence markers, are designed with dynamic labels that read the feature’s attribute information. This dynamic text should not be converted to shape.

Create Symbol

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To complete the symbol process, group the objects and choose Edit > Create Symbol from the main menu. Name your symbol and assign it to an appropriate category, then click the Create button. It will be added to your Library as a symbol master.

Credits

A special thanks to Mr. Richard Brummett for allowing us to use his his work in this tutorial. These and several other crests, patches, and maps were created exclusively with Ortelius by Richard to accompany the upcoming book “Search and Destroy” by Keith W. Nolan and published by Zenith Press of Minneapolis (anticipated July 2010). Keith died last February at age 44 and this will be his twelfth and final book on the Viet Nam War.

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Map Points of Interest with Smart Sequence Markers

When you need to map points of interest with numbered placemarkers, look no further than Ortelius’ smart Sequence Markers. These symbols save time and sanity. Place Sequence Markers just like any other symbol and they’ll automatically number themselves 1,2,3… (we should call them magic).

Our customers have been finding Sequence Markers really useful, and with their suggestions we’ve made Sequence Markers even better. This tutorial demonstrates some of the advanced (and super easy) Sequence Marker features.

Placing Sequence Markers

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Use Sequence Markers over your own custom maps, aerial photographs, even scanned maps and drawings.

Like all symbols, quickly find Sequence Markers in the Symbols palette by typing “sequence” into the palette’s search bar. Note, you won’t see any numbers when viewing the markers in the palette. Choose a marker and place it using the Symbol Stamp tool. Markers automatically number themselves 1, 2, 3… in the order in which they are placed.

Instantly Re-Order the Sequence

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Wow. Sometimes you change your mind pretty fast. Shouldn’t you be able to change the order of Sequence Markers just as quickly? Ortelius provides several ways to re-order sequence numbers to fit the way you work best.

Delete re-orders the sequence
After placing a series of Sequence Markers, if a marker in the series is deleted the remaining markers will automatically renumber so there are no gaps in the sequence.

Grouping re-orders sequence
Grouping two or more markers in the sequence will automatically renumber the grouped markers, placing the grouped markers at the end of the sequence.

Use Object Inspector to re-order sequence
Change a the sequence of a marker from the Object Inspector – Features pane. Select a marker and use the up and down arrows under “Sequence” to edit the selected marker’s sequence number.

Edit > Symbols > Sequence to re-order sequence
Changes to the sequence can be made by selecting a marker and choosing options from Edit > Symbols > Sequence in the main menu. Options include “Move to start,” “Move to end,” “Move backward,” and “Move forward.”

Note, as with any symbol you can also change the scale of sequence markers from the Object Inspector – Features pane.

On-the-Fly Sequence Type

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Need numeric, roman numerals, alphabetic? No problem.

Sequence markers can be switched to different types, such as numeric (1,2,3…), alphabetical (A,B,C…), roman numeral (I, II, III…), just choose the type in the Object Inspector – Features pane when a sequence marker is selected. Alternatively, choose Edit > Symbol > Sequence > and choose the type. Changing the marker type applies to all markers in the active sequence.

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Simple Symbol Scaling with Ortelius

Ortelius is packed with hundreds of styles and symbols. Now it’s easier than ever to make fine adjustments to symbol sizes on your map. Here’s how…

Manually Scale Symbol

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Individual symbols can be resized, or scaled, directly by grabbing the lower-right sizing handle on the symbol and dragging inward or outward.

Note, symbols in the Library are “master symbols.” When you place a symbol on your map with the Symbol Stamp tool, you place a copy, or instance, of the master on your map. When you make changes to that instance, such as changing the scale of a symbol, the master symbol is unaffected by the change.

Set Scale Factor Using the Object Inspector

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Select one or more symbol and adjust the scale factor from the Object Inspector – Features pane. Scale can be adjusted via the slider bar or by entering a percent scale factor. As of Ortelius release 1.0.6, multiple symbols can be scale at one time. It’s that easy!

Pre-scale Map Symbols

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On occasion, mappers may work with a symbol set that is based on exacting symbol specifications. For example, symbols for the International Specification for Orienteering Maps are sized according to exact specifications for viewing at a particular scale (1:15,000). Their specification allows symbols to be rendered at 150% for viewing on 1:10,000 maps. Ortelius makes it easy to pre-scale all map symbols to before they are even placed on your map. Choose File > Drawing Setup in the main menu to set the pre-scale factor. Note, under most circumstances this setting should remain at the default 100%.

Family History Map

Mapping Family History with Ortelius

Maps are tremendous genealogical tools to help build a more comprehensive understanding of what life was like for your ancestors, looking at locations, migration routes, political boundaries, and more. Custom maps let you personalize the historical geography and highlight features relevant to family reports, documents, and photographs.

Here is an example of a family history map made with Ortelius showing the northeast Italian region of Udine (c. 1910). Click here to view a PDF export of the finished map in all its glory.

Tracing Source Maps

Two common techniques for creating custom maps from a source map are 1) to draw over an existing map or aerial photograph highlighting features and adding new information, while leaving the original source map as the background image, and 2) tracing relevant features and then “turning off” the source map, thus resulting in a completely new map.

Remember to consider copyright issues if you intend to publish your finished map and it includes a copyrighted source map.

Finding Source Maps

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Finding source maps for tracing can sometimes be a challenge. Fortunately there are many sources of current and historical maps available online. Our example of Drenchia and Stregna, Italy is made by tracing parts of a 1909 source map from the Third Military Mapping Survey of Austria-Hungary. When looking for source map material, try a Google search of the location and date. Here are a few of our favorite historical map sites, many available for download or online viewing:

 

For more local scale mapping, try your local government agency plat maps and local library collections. In U.S. urban areas, search for Sanborn Fire Insurance maps available at many public and university libraries. Historic railroad and survey maps can also be valuable source material.

Getting Started

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After finding the right source map, decide on your page layout and map size. If you aren’t familiar with using Ortelius’ drawing tools, the Ortelius’ Getting Started With Ortelius guide (PDF version 6.77MB) and Getting Started are a great place to start.

Genealogy maps are a fun and interesting way to incorporate the spirit of place into your family history. Ortelius comes prepackaged with hundreds of styles and symbols, and it is easy to create your own custom maps. If you are making a series of maps, consider using a consistent style of colors and map symbols throughout to give your maps a unified look and feel.

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Create Square, Diamond, Hex Repeating Grid Patterns

Create interesting repeating grid patterns with the Hatch Fill and Pattern Fill components in the Ortelius Style Inspector. A wide variety of repeating patterns, including square and hexagonal grids, are available in the default style set. Here’s how to get creative with your own.

 

Using the Hatch Fill Component

Simple grid patterns are made super easy with Hatch Fill. First draw a largish shape on your drawing canvas. With this shape selected your new style will be applied so you can view your pattern as you create it.

  1. Open the Style Inspector and choose “New Style” from the drop-down Action Menu (looks like a gear).
  2. To create any regular grid, you’ll overlay two sets of lines at 90-degree angles from each other. Do this by adding “+” a Hatch Fill component and setting your line style. You can adjust color, width, spacing, and even make rough wobbly lines.
  3. Next, under the Action Menu, choose “Duplicate Style Component” to add an exact copy. In this second Hatch Fill component, change the angle of the style so it is 90-degrees from the first (for demonstration we’ve also changed the color).
  4. You’ve just created your first grid! Name the style and add it to the Library if you want to keep it for future use.

Grid Using Hatch Fill

Try a diamond pattern by setting the first Hatch Fill angle to 45-degrees and the second Hatch Fill to 135-degrees. Voila, a diamond grid!

Using the Pattern Fill Component

For more complex grids use the Pattern Fill component. In the Style Inspector, choose “New Style” from the drop-down Action Menu. To create your custom fill pattern, we need to create the smallest possible element that can be repeated in a pattern. The following shows a hexagonal pattern, and the red rectangle shows where the pattern repeats:Repeating Pattern in Hex Grid

  1. First create the drawing element(s) that will be the building block for your pattern (see the hint below for hex patterns). In your drawing area, use the drawing tools to draw the repeating portion of your pattern. On most grid patterns, the key is to have equidistant lines for a regular grid.
  2. After you’ve completed your drawing element, copy it and work with the copy (that way you’ll have the original if you want to tweek it a bit more). Working with the copy, select your drawing objects and use the Graphics > Combine > Append function from the main menu. (This is mostly done for efficiency – to make the shape smaller and simpler. You could just as easily group them together, but Ortelius likes Append since it creates a single shape. It’s smaller on disk and probably adds slightly to performance since there’s less data to read.)
  3. Then, simply copy and paste the graphic into the pattern-well in the Style Inspector to create the repeating pattern. Adjust your pattern settings (size, spacing, etc).
  4. Some patterns will use more than one instance of the Pattern Fill component. For instance, a hexagonal grid requires two Pattern Fill components – one for the left side of the pattern and one for the right.
  5. Name the style and add it to the Library if you want to keep it for future use.
Left and right side of hex pattern elements, with orange spacers

Left and right side of hex pattern elements, with orange spacers

HINT: With a hexagonal grid, we need two pattern elements (the left and right sides of the pattern) and spacers need inserted to achieve the desired results. Make the color of your spacers fully transparent so they don’t show on your end result (here we’ve colored them orange). Create one side of the element first, then group, copy/paste, and flip it to create the other element. Look at an existing hex pattern from the Style Inspector to get ideas on the settings. Finally, if you will be layering the grid pattern on top of your map, make sure there is no solid fill as part of your pattern.

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Create a Dashing Stroke Style

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create the perfect dashed stroke style for your next map.

Draw a Line To Preview Your New Style As It Is Built

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Draw a line on the Ortelius drawing canvas so you can preview your style changes as you build a new style. Open the Style Inspector and navigate to the “Expert” pane. Keep your line selected for the next step.

Create New Style

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From the Action Menu (looks like a gear), choose “New Style” from the drop-down list. A new ad-hoc style will be created ready for your use. Alternatively, choose “Clone Style” to create an new ad-hoc style based on the current one.

Edit Style Components

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For this example, delete the Fill style component by selecting it from the list and clicking the “–” delete button.

Next, select the Stroke style component and change the line width. Note: you may see drawing units or real world units instead of points – display units are changed by choosing View > Display Units from the main menu.

Optionally, click onto the color well to edit the color of your stroke, in this example we’ll use an Ortelius blue.

Add a Dashed Stroke

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Add a second stroke by clicking “+” add button and choosing “Stroke” style component from the drop-down menu. The new stroke will lay on top of your original stroke. Make it 1.0pt wide and change the color to white.

Choose a dash pattern from the “Dash” drop-down menu or choose “other” to customize your dash pattern.

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To make adjustments to your dash pattern, choose “Other” from the drop-down menu. The length of individual dashes and spaces can be finely adjusted. Your dash pattern can contain pairs, for example a dash-dot-dash pattern.

By checking “Scale to path’s stroke weight” the dash pattern will automatically adjust if the stroke weight is changed.

Alternatively, dashes can be adjusted by grabbing and dragging the dash handles in the style-well.

HINT: To create a dotted line pattern, adjust the stroke width and dash length to be the same and choose round-ended end-caps for the stroke cap style.

Name and Save

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Notice the style does not yet have a name. This will be an ad-hoc style until you name it and add it to the Library. If you are creating the style for one-time use, you do not need to save it to the Library.

When you are satisfied with your new style, return to the “Style” header in the style component list and name it. Click “Add Style To Library” and add it to an appropriate category. Your style is now in the Library and ready for repeated use. Choose a drawing tool and select your new style from the Symbols Palette.