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Available Style Components

From the Style Inspector, a wide assortment of components are available to create awesome custom styles.

What you can achieve with custom styles is nearly limitless. For example, with the Roughened Stroke, you can easily mimic pencil lines or markers. The Tagged Stroke offers an amazing flexibility for easily creating hatched strokes. Add repeatable patterns along strokes, such as adding flowers along a path. Create tile fills for textures. Stack multiple style components together. Ortelius’ Style Inspector helps you build and save your creations – enabling more creativity and greater productivity.

To Add a Stroke and Edit Its Properties:

To_Add_a_Stroke_and_Edit_Its_Properties.png
  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Stroke’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for strokes:
  • COLOR – Press and hold the color-well to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • WIDTH – Set line width with the slider, highlight the text and type the line width, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the line width.
  • SOLID LINE or DASH – Choose ‘Solid Line’ or a dash pattern from the drop-down list, or choose ‘Other…’ to define a custom dash pattern in the dialog that is presented.
  • LINE-CAP and CORNER-JOIN – Click the icons to choose butted, rounded or square line caps (the appearance at the end of the stroke); and mitered, round, or beveled corners.
  • CLIPPING – Choose from ‘None’ for no clipping, ‘Inside’ to clip the visual stroke to the inside of the path centerline, or ‘Outside’ to clip the visual stroke to the outside of the path centerline.
  • OFFSET – Use the slider to offset the visible stroke to the left or right of the path centerline.
  • SHADOW – Check the box to enable the stroke shadow. Press and drag the knob to adjust the shadow angle. Move the sliders to adjust the shadow distance and blur. Press and hold the color-wells to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel and change the shadow color.

HINT: Select the color well and choose from millions of colors using the Colors panel. From the Colors panel, transparency can also be set using the Opacity Slider. See Making the Most of Your Apple Color Picker for more information.

HINT: Heavy use of shadows can affect drawing speed. For good performance, a preference hides shadows when viewing the document above 800% zoom. This preference can be changed and/or disabled in the (app) > Preferences … Performance dialog.

To Add an Arrowed or Dimension Line Stroke:

To_Add_an_Arrowed_or_Dimension_Line_Stroke.png
  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Arrowed Stroke’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. Color, line width, dash, and shadow properties are set in the same way as a standard stroke.
  3. The following additional properties can be edited for Arrowed stroke:
  • ARROW HEAD (END) STYLE – The Arrowed Stroke is highly flexible in that you can set arrow head style on one or both ends. Choose a beginning and/or end style from the drop-down lists.
  • ARROW SIZE / SHAPE – Set the arrowhead size by dragging the knob (small square) In the arrow preview area.
  • DIMENSION LINE LABEL – Choose the dimension setting, including the location along the line, tolerance, and the dimension unit (linear, diameter, radius, or angle). Edit the font appearance by clicking the “A” button. Dimensions will be displayed in the current drawing units.

To Add a Rough Stroke:

To_Add_a_Rough_Stroke.png
  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Roughened Stroke’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. Color, line width, dash, and shadow properties are set in the same way as a standard stroke.
  3. The following additional properties can be edited for Roughened stroke:
  • ROUGHNESS – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent roughness of the stroke.

To Add a Tagged Stroke:

To_Add_a_Tagged_Stroke.png

The Tagged Stroke offers an amazing flexibility for easily creating strokes with “tags” or hatches.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Tagged Stroke’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. Color, line width, dash, and shadow properties are set in the same way as a standard stroke.
  3. The following additional properties can be edited for Tagged stroke:
  • SHOW MAIN STROKE – Check to show the main stroke, uncheck to hide the main stroke and show tags only.
  • TAG KIND – Press the ‘Kind’ drop-down list to choose the appearance of the tag, such as lines, squares, triangles, semi-circles, circles and “v”s.
  • TAG WIDTH – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the width of the tags.
  • TAG LENGTH – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the length of the tags.
  • TAG SPACING – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the spacing of the tags along the path.
  • TAG PHASE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent of the path shown before the tags start.
  • TAG ANGLE – Press and drag the knob to adjust the tag’s angle.
  • ALTERNATING TAGS – When checked, alternating tags are placed to opposite sides of the stroke.
  • TAG TAPER – Check the boxes to taper the tags off as they reach the left or right side of the path. Choose the type of taper to be applied. Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent distance of the taper to ends of the path.

To Add a Tapered Stroke:

To_Add_a_Tapered_Stroke.png

Ortelius’ Tapered Stroke supplies an easy way to build styles for elegant paths.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Tapered Stroke’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. Color, line width, dash, and shadow properties are set in the same way as a standard stroke.
  3. The following additional properties can be edited for Tapered stroke:
  • TAPER – Check the boxes to taper the tags off as they reach the left and/or right side of the path. Choose the type of taper to be applied. Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent distance of the taper to ends of the path.

To Add a Zig-Zag Stroke:

To_Add_a_Zig-Zag_Stroke.png
  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Zig-Zag Stroke’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. Color, line width, dash, and shadow properties are set in the same way as a standard stroke.
  3. The following additional properties can be edited for Zig-Zag stroke:
  • AMP – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the amplitude (distance from centerline) of the zig-zag wave effect.
  • WAVE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the wavelength (distance between waves) of the zig-zag wave effect.
  • SPREAD – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the curvature of the peaks of the wave.

To Add a Path Decorator:

To_Add_a_Path_Decorator.png

Add objects, symbols, or images repeatedly along a path using Path Decorator. For example, draw a circle on the drawing canvas and copy it. Paste it into the image well under Path Decorator. The circle is now added at regular intervals along the path.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Path Decorator’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for Path Decorator:
  • IMAGE – Copy a small graphic from your drawing and click ‘Paste Image’, or click ‘Image File…’ to launch Finder and select an image. Vector graphics (such as those copied/pasted from your drawing) are converted to PDF images and are not editable when part of a style component.
  • TANGENT TO PATH – When checked, each image will be aligned to the paths curvature. When uncheck each image will be aligned to the page.
  • SCALE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent scale factor of the image.
  • SPACING – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the distance between each image.
  • LEAD-IN – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the distance from the start of the path before images are applied.
  • END RAMP – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the proportion of path length where images are gradually scaled up to their final size.
  • OFFSET – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the lateral displacement of images from the path centerline.
  • ALTERNATING OFFSET – When checked, alternating images are placed to opposite sides and with 180-degree rotation.
  • CLIPPING – Choose from the drop-down list to clip images to the inside or outside of the path.

HINT: For good performance (drawing speed), the image should be small, not too complex, and not too closely spaced.

To Add a Color Fill:

To_Add_a_Color_Fill.png
  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Color Fill’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for Color Fill:
  • COLOR – Press and hold the color-well to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • IMAGE – Copy a small graphic from your drawing and click ‘Paste Image’, or click ‘Image File…’ to launch Finder and select an image. Vector graphics (such as those copied/pasted from your drawing) are converted to PDF images and are not editable when part of a style component. Useful for tiled images whose properties do not need adjusted.
  • SHADOW – Check the box to enable the stroke shadow. Press and drag the knob to adjust the shadow angle. Move the sliders to adjust the shadow distance and blur. Press and hold the color-wells to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel and change the shadow color.

HINT: Select the color well and choose from millions of colors using the Colors panel. From the Colors panel, transparency can also be set using the Opacity Slider. See Making the Most of Your Apple Color Picker for more information.

HINT: Heavy use of shadows can affect drawing speed. For good performance, a preference hides shadows when viewing the document above 800% zoom. This preference can be changed and/or disabled in the (app) > Preferences … Performance dialog.

To Add a Gradient Fill:

To_Add_a_Gradient_Fill.png

Use Gradient Fill for stylish linear and radial gradients. The gradient well gives you the “big” picture as you build the style. Gradients can have 2 or more color-stops for awesome effects.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Gradient Fill’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for Gradient Fill:
  • COLOR SLIDER – The color slider is the place to control color selection and placement. To set gradient colors, select the color stops at each end of the gradient bar. Choose colors form the Colors panel. Add and remove color stops using the “+” and “-” on the left side of the gradient bar, or drag color stops off of the slider bar to remove them. Drag color stops to reposition along the gradient bar.
  • LINEAR GRADIENT – Choose for a linear gradient.
  • **LINEAR GRADIENT ANGLE – In the gradient-well, rotate the knob on the Iris control to set the angle of the gradient. Hold the SHIFT-key to constrain the angle of the gradient to 15-degree increments.
  • RADIAL GRADIENT – Choose for a gradient radiating outward from a point.
  • **RADIAL GRADIENT POSITION AND RADIUS – In the gradient-well, drag Iris-control rings to adjust the center point of a radial gradient. Drag ring tabs to set gradient radius and adjust the color blend between two circles of color.
  • ANGLE RELATIVE TO OBJECT – Checked makes the gradient angle to be set relative to the object. Unchecked makes the gradient angle to be set relative to the page.

To Add a Zig-Zag Fill:

To_Add_a_Zig-Zag_Fill.png
  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Zig-Zag Fill’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. Color, and shadow properties are set in the same way as a color fill.
  3. The following additional properties can be edited for Zig-Zag fill:
  • AMP – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the amplitude (distance from edge) of the zig-zag wave effect.
  • WAVE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the wavelength (distance between waves) of the zig-zag wave effect.
  • SPREAD – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the curvature of the peaks of the wave.

To Add a Pattern Fill:

To_Add_a_Pattern_Fill.png

Using the Pattern Fill, objects, symbols, or images are regularly repeated within the fill area.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Pattern Fill’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for Pattern Fill:
  • IMAGE – Copy a small graphic from your drawing and click ‘Paste Image’, or click ‘Image File…’ to launch Finder and select an image. Vector graphics (such as those copied/pasted from your drawing) are converted to PDF images and are not editable when part of a style component. Useful for tiled images whose properties do not need adjusted.
  • SCALE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent scale factor of the image.
  • SPACING – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the distance between each image.
  • ALT OFFSET – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the proportion of additional offset applied to alternating rows.
  • ANGLE – Press and drag the knob to adjust the overall pattern angle around the center point.
  • RAND SPACING – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to apply a randomness factor to the motif’s position.
  • RAND SCALE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to apply a randomness factor to the motif’s scale.
  • RAND ANGLE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to apply a randomness factor to the motif’s angle.
  • ANGLE RELATIVE TO OBJECT – When checked, the pattern’s overall angle is relative to the object. When unchecked, the pattern’s overall angle is relative to the page.
  • IMAGE ANGLE IS RELATIVE TO PATTERN ANGLE – When checked, individual motif’s image angle is relative to the overall pattern angle.
  • SUPPRESS CLIPPED IMAGES – When checked, images that would be clipped by the object’s path are not drawn.

HINT: For good performance (drawing speed), the image should be small, not too complex, and not too closely spaced.

About Suppressing Clipped Images:

About_Suppressing_Clipped_Images.png

HINT: When a new object is drawn using a pattern fill style, the image objects in the pattern may appear clipped at the edges of the shape. You can use “Suppress clipped images” to hide images at the edge of a shape if they would otherwise appear as clipped.

To Add a Hatch Fill and Dot Screen:

To_Add_a_Hatch_Fill_and_Dot_Screen.png

Hatch fill is used to create patterns of lines or dots. This component offers control over line width, spacing, lead-in, color, and angle. Lines can be dashed, and roughness and wobble can even be added to create a wavy pattern. Add two or more Hatch Fill components with differing angles to create checkered and grid patterns.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Hatch Fill’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for Hatch Fill:
  • LINE WIDTH – Set line width with the slider, highlight the text and type the line width, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the line width.
  • SPACING – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the distance between each line.
  • LEAD-IN – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the lead-in, or phase, of the hatch.
  • ANGLE – Press and drag the knob to adjust the hatch line angle.
  • ANGLE RELATIVE TO OBJECT – When checked, the hatch’s overall angle is relative to the object. When unchecked, the hatch’s overall angle is relative to the page.
  • SOLID LINE or DASH – Choose ‘Solid Line’ or a dash pattern from the drop-down list, or choose ‘Other…’ to define a custom dash pattern in the dialog that is presented.
  • COLOR – Press and hold the color-well to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • ROUGHNESS – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent roughness of the lines.
  • WOBBLE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent “wobbliness” or random offset of each line.
  • DOT DENSITY – To generate a dot pattern, highlight the text and type the percent dot density, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the dot density. After setting a dot density, changing “Line width” with a dot pattern adjusts the dot diameter. Changes to other properties then apply to the dot pattern.

To Add an Image Adornment:

To_Add_an_Image_Adornment.png

Although they look similar, an Image Adornment is different from adding a regular image object to your drawing. An Image Adornment is an actual component of the style, which can be applied like any style to any shape. Whereas a regular image object (for example, added from the Image Browser) is a single object.

  1. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Image Adornment’ from the drop-down menu.
  2. The following properties can be edited for Image Adornment:
  • IMAGE – Copy a small graphic from your drawing and click ‘Paste Image’, or click ‘Image File…’ to launch Finder and select an image. Vector graphics (such as those copied/pasted from your drawing) are converted to PDF images and are not editable when part of a style component. Useful for tiled images whose properties do not need adjusted.
  • FIT OBJECT – When selected, the image is scaled to fit the object (image may be stretched).
  • FIT MAINTAINING ASPECT RATIO – When selected, the image is scaled to fit the object while maintaining the aspect ratio (image width or height may be artificially cropped).
  • SCALE – When selected, the image is scaled according to a user-defined scale factor. Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent scale factor of the image.
  • OPACITY – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the percent opacity of the image adornment.
  • ANGLE – Press and drag the knob to adjust the overall pattern angle around the center point.
  • CLIP TO PATH – When checked, the image is clipped to the object’s path.

HINT: Dropping an image from the Image Browser or Finder onto any shape with a fill automatically adds the image as an Image adornment. Use the Style Inspector to adjust the Image Adornment settings.

To Add a Bridge Adornment:

A bridge adornment is a custom overlay style used when your needs are beyond what is supplied with the standard bridge symbol accessed through Edit > Insert Special > Bridge. Unlike normal styles, an overlay style is created and saved to your library in one step, then applied to a track in another step.

CREATE THE OVERLAY STYLE

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track to accept the new style.
  2. Open the Style Inspector and click ‘Clone’ – using ‘Clone’ helps to visualize how the custom bridge style will look with your track as you create it.
  3. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Bridge’ from the drop-down menu.
  4. Drag the ‘Bridge’ style component to the top of the style component list so it appears under the other track styles.
  5. Adjust the style component properties as desired. The following properties can be edited for Bridge adornment:
  • COLOR – Press and hold the color-well to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • LINE WIDTH – Set line width with the slider, highlight the text and type the line width, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the line width.
  • PIER SIZE – Size of the bridge piers.
  • SPACING – Distance between each pier (is automatically adjusted to evenly space piers between bridge ends).
  • WIDTH – Width of the bridge.
  • AUTO-SIZE PIERS AND SPACING – Bridge parameters are automatically derived from the path width of the track object to which they are to be applied.

6. Remove the other non-bridge style components from the style components list.
7. Return to the main Style Inspector view, then name and save the new bridge style to your user library.

APPLY THE OVERLAY STYLE
Remember, to place a custom overlay style to a track, save the style to your User collection and do the following:

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the new overlay style.
  2. Hold down the OPTION-key and double-click the style in the Styles & Symbols palette.

HINT: If you inadvertently deselect the track with the bridge while you are in the process of formatting its custom style, use the Linear Select tool to highlight the bridge and it will appear again in the Style Inspector.

To Add a Tunnel Adornment:

To_Add_a_Tunnel_Adornment.png

A tunnel adornment is a custom in-line style used when your needs are beyond what is supplied with the standard tunnel symbol accessed through Edit > Insert Special > Tunnel. Unlike normal styles, an in-line style is created and saved to your library in one step, then applied to a track in another step.

CREATE THE IN-LINE STYLE

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track to accept the new style.
  2. Open the Style Inspector and click ‘Reset’ or ‘Clone’ .
  3. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Tunnel’ from the drop-down menu.
  4. Optionally, remove the other style components from the style component list.
  5. Adjust the style component properties as desired. The following properties can be edited for Tunnel adornment:
  • COLOR – Press and hold the color-well to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • LINE WIDTH – Set line width with the slider, highlight the text and type the line width, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the line width.
  • TUNNEL TYPE – Choose among a rounded or angular tunnel “portal” type.
  • DEPTH – The depth of the tunnel “portal”.
  • SPAN – The breadth (span) or the tunnel “portal”.

6. Return to the main Style Inspector view, then name and save the new bridge style to your user library.

APPLY THE IN-LINE STYLE
Remember, to place a custom in-line style to a track, save the style to your User collection and do the following:

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the new overlay style.
  2. Double-click the style in the Styles & Symbols palette.

To Add a Cutting & Embankment Adornment:

A cutting or embankment adornment is a custom overlay style used when your needs are beyond what is supplied with the standard bridge symbol accessed through Edit > Insert Special > Cutting (or Embankment). Unlike normal styles, an overlay style is created and saved to your library in one step, then applied to a track in another step.

CREATE THE OVERLAY STYLE

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track to accept the new style.
  2. Open the Style Inspector and click ‘Clone’ – using ‘Clone’ helps to visualize how the custom style will look with your track as you create it.
  3. Press the ‘+’ button and choose ‘Cutting & Embankment’ from the drop-down menu.
  4. Adjust the style component properties as desired. The following properties can be edited for Bridge adornment:
  • CUTTING/EMBANKMENT – Choose among cutting or embankment overlay style.
  • COLOR – Press and hold the color-well to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • SCALE – Image scaling factor.
  • SCALE VARIABLE – Sets a variable scaling factor.
  • SPACING – Distance between each image.
  • WOBBLE – “Wobbliness” factor or random offset of images.
  • END RAMP – Proportion of path length where images are gradually scaled up to their final size.
  • OFFSET – Lateral displacement of images from path center line.
  • ALTERNATING OFFSET – Alternate images are displaced to opposite sides and with 180-degree rotation when checked.
  • CLIPPING – Images may be clipped to the inside or outside of the path.

6. Remove the other non-cutting/embankment style components from the style components list.
7. Return to the main Style Inspector view, then name and save the new cutting/embankment style to your user library.

APPLY THE OVERLAY STYLE
Remember, to place a custom overlay style to a track, save the style to your User collection and do the following:

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the new overlay style.
  2. Hold down the OPTION-key and double-click the style in the Styles & Symbols palette.

HINT: If you inadvertently deselect the track with the cutting/embankment while you are in the process of formatting its custom style, use the Linear Select tool to highlight the cutting/embankment and it will appear again in the Style Inspector.

To Add a Label Adornment:

To_Add_a_Label_Adornment.png

A label adornment pre-defines the label styling properties to be used with a style. Once defined, the label style component is changed to ‘Disabled” so it is displayed only when applied interactively to an object in your map.

  1. Draw a path or shape to let you visualize how the label will look with the style.
  2. With the object still selected, open the Style Inspector and click ‘Reset’ or ‘Clone’ to create a new style.
  3. Press the ‘+’ button, and choose ‘Label’ from the drop-down menu ‘Adornment’ section.
  4. Do one of the following:
  • If you have a shape object to receive the label, choose ‘Flow text into object’s rectangle’ from the ‘Layout’ drop-down menu.
  • If you have a path object to receive the label, choose ‘Along object’s path’ from the ‘Layout’ drop-down menu.
  • Choose another option (such as ‘Along reverse path’) from the ‘Layout’ drop-down menu as desired.

5. Adjust the remaining style component properties as desired. The following properties can be edited for Label adornment:

  • VERTICAL – The vertical alignment options (align top, middle, bottom, center on path, variable); if ‘Variable’ is chosen, the vertical alignment slider becomes active letting you interactively set the vertical alignment.
  • WRAP LINES – The text is wrapped when checked; if unchecked only a single line is drawn (shapes only).
  • ANGLE – Rotation angle of the text.
  • ANGLE RELATIVE TO OBJECT – Text angle is relative to the object when checked.
  • CLIP TO PATH – Text is clipped to object’s path when checked.
  • TEXT COLOR – Text color.
  • JUSTIFICATION – Horizontal justification of text.
  • FONT – Opens Fonts panel.
  • OUTLINE – Text has an outline when checked.
  • MASK – Text has a mask when checked.

6. The default text label reads “Text Adornment”, is displayed as entered, and can be left blank. Alternatively, a look-up ‘tag’ can be applied that will look up the label value according to any object attributes that may exist (as defined in the Object Inspector – Attributes pane). To define the content of a label, do one of the following:

  • Double-click the text in the text-well to select it for editing and begin typing – when a text label is added to an object the label is displayed as entered.
  • Double-click the text in the text-well to select it for editing and delete it – when a text label is added to an object the label is displayed as “Label” and can be edited directly on the object with a double-click.
  • Double-click the text in the text-well to select it for editing and choose a tag from the ‘Tags’ drop-down list (Route Number, Sequence Number, Sequence Cardinal, or Name) – when a text label is added to an object the label is displayed as the attribute value, if it exists (if no attribute exists, it will be displayed as “Label”).
  • Double-click the text in the text-well to select it for editing and type “%%” followed immediately by a custom attribute to be used in the label (for example, ‘%%CITYNAME’). The ‘%%’ preface indicates to Ortelius that the value is to be looked up.

7. IMPORTANT: Once the label is formatted, uncheck the ‘Enabled’ check box in the style components list. This hides the label adornment until a label is interactively added to an object.
8. Return to the main Style Inspector view, then name and save the new style to your user library.

HINT: See Using Map Text Labels, Text Labeling Area Features, Text Labeling Point Features, and Text Labeling Linear Features for more information on using Ortelius’ powerful labeling system.

To Add an Effects Group:

An ‘Effects Group’ applies certain effects, such as blurs and blooms, to other style components within your style. To apply an effects group:

Draw a shape or a path so you can visualize the label as you define the style.
Press the ‘+’ button, and from the drop-down menu ‘Groups’ section, choose ‘Core Image Filter’ or ‘Transform’.

  1. Do one of the following:
  • With the Effects Group (either ‘Core Image Filter’ or ‘Transform’) selected in the style components list, press the ‘+’ button and choose any style component from the drop-down menu. The style component will be added nested within the group.
  • Click onto other style components in the style components list and drag them into (or under) the Effect Group. They will appear as nested within the group.
  • To remove a style component from an Effects Group, drag the component out of the group.

To Add a Core Image Filter Effects Group:

To_Add_a_Core_Image_Filter_Effects_Group.png

Core Image Filters are advanced style component that apply filters to other style components. A wide assortment of image filters are available. This example shows an orange stroke moved into the Core Image Filter Group.

  1. Add the ‘Core Image Filter’ effects group and arrange the desired style components nested within the group (see above).
  2. Click onto the effects group name in the Style Component list to reveal the available filters.
  3. From the drop-down list, select a filter effect to apply to the group.
  4. Once a filter effect is selected, a set of filter-specific properties is presented that may be adjusted by the user.

HINT: Filters are well suited to work with images such as an Image Adornment style component, while a limited number of filters work well with strokes and fills, such as Gaussian Blur.

To Add a Transform Effects Group:

To_Add_a_Transform_Effects_Group.png

‘Transform’ enables interesting 3-d visual effects. Based on user input, transform adds copies of the style component in a stacked fashion under the original object.

  1. Add the ‘Transform’ effects group and arrange the desired style components nested within the group (see above).
  2. Click onto the effects group name in the Style Component list to reveal the available properties.
  3. The following properties can be edited for Transform:
  • NUMBER OF ADDITIONAL COPIES – Highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to set the number of copies to be added to the stack.
  • X OFFSET – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the X offset and slide the stack in a distance and direction from the center of the object at the angle designated.
  • Y OFFSET – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the Y offset and slide the stack in a distance and direction from the center of the object at the angle designated
  • X SCALE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the adjust the X scale (size) of the copies.
  • Y SCALE – Use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the adjust the Y scale (size) of the copies.
  • RELATIVE ANGLE – When checked, the transform is calculated relative to the object’s angle.
  • ROTATE – Press and drag the knob to adjust the rotation angle of each copy.
  • REVERSE – When checked, that transform effects are applied in reverse order.
  • BLEND – When checked, each copy’s color is a blend between the original color and the blend color here (use the color-well to set color).

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Using Map Text Labels

Labels go hand-in-hand with the map’s styles and symbols, so of course we’ve designed them to work together. Unlike ordinary text placed with the Text tools, labels are attached to map features. If the feature moves, the label moves with it. Labels make naming map features easy with intelligent naming, advanced styling, and just-right positioning.

Ortelius’ labeling system opens a new chapter in WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) feature labeling. No more going through multi-level menus and dialogs to turn on labels and change settings, only to have to repeat the process multiple times to get the right look. Direct feature labeling provides a revolutionary way to add and edit labels – directly on your map.

About Labels with Style:

About_Labels_with_Style.png

Ortelius is loaded with hundreds of styles and symbols. Styles not only define the look of lines and areas, they can also define the initial style for labels. So, when you place a river using a river style, the river’s label style is already designed for you. As always, label styles are fully editable directly on the map, and you can easily create and share your own custom styles using the Style Inspector.

Changing a label directly will not over-write the Library style, rather these changed labels will be saved as “ad-hoc” styles unless they are created using the Style Inspector and added to the Library. Use ad-hoc styles when their use will be occasional. Use Library styles and symbols when they will be used repeatedly or need to be used later in other maps.

Changing label text styles is similar to changing them on simple text objects. Select the label(s) and edit the font in the Fonts palette. This method can be used with multiple labels at one time.

To Select Labels:

To_Select_Labels.png

Selected labels are shown using bubble-shaped highlights to distinguish the label selection from other kinds of selections in your drawing.

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Click onto an object label to select it.
  • To select multiple labels, hold the Shift-key and click additional labels, or hold the Command-key and click to select or deselect labels.
  • Double-click to make the label active for editing.

To Show (or Hide) Labels:

To_Show__or_Hide__Labels.png

Labels can be turned on or off (visible or hidden) on your map.

Do one of the following:

  • Selecting the labeled feature(s) and choosing Edit > Labels & Text > Hide(Show) Labels from the main menu.
  • Choose Edit > Select All and then Hide Labels to turn off all labels on a layer.

About Labels for Symbols, Tracks, and Shapes:

About_Labels_for_Symbols__Tracks__and_Shapes.png

Each feature type – lines, points, and areas – has context-sensitive positioning for labels. For example, symbol labels for point features can be placed in one of nine standard positions around and at the center point (the upper-right position is the default). Track labels follow linear features and are positioned above, on, or below the line. Area feature labels are placed at the visual center of the shape.

Labels can also be moved into any position around the symbol by simply holding the Shift-key on the keyboard while moving it into the perfect position. Optional leader-lines can be added by right-clicking the label and choosing “Show Leader Line.” Of course, if it is ever needed, you can always right-click the label and choose “Detach Label” to move it anywhere (the label will be completely detached from the feature and its attributes, and become an ordinary text object).

Free-text labels may be added to any point symbol, track, or shape object. Simple shapes, connectable tracks, symbols, and shapes from imported shapefiles support labeling. If you have an area object created with another drawing tool, for instance an irregular polygon, select the object and choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu, or right-click the object and choose Convert To Shape.

To Add Free-Text Labels:

To_Add_Free-Text_Labels.png
  1. Do one of the following:
  • Select the symbol(s) or shape(s) and choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu. If the feature has attribute information behind it that includes the feature’s name, the label may automatically detect and label the feature with its name. Otherwise, the word “Label” will be inserted for editing.
  • For a single object, right-click and choose ‘New Label’ from the context menu.

2. With the Select [s] tool, double-click the label to select it. You may see a code starting with “%%” highlighted – ignore this tag and type a free-text label with the text you want. As with simple text objects, double-click the label to edit it any time.

HINT: Special shapes, such as stars, arcs, and rounded-rectangles must be converted to regular shapes before a label can be added. Select the special shape and choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu, or right-click and choose ‘Convert To Shape’ from the contextual menu.

To Label Multiple Features:

The power of Ortelius’ labeling system includes swift labeling of the features you want – all features or just a select few. Manually adding a label to each feature is not necessary.

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Select the features you want to label and choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.

HINT: To select the features you want labeled hold down the SHIFT key and click each object with the Select tool, or use Edit > Select All to select all features on a layer, or use Ortelius’ advanced search to select specific features (for example, to select and label cities with populations over 100,000). Then choose Edit > Labels & Text > Paste Label from the main menu.

To Create an Ad-Hoc Label to Apply to Multiple Objects:

  1. Add a label to a feature and use the Fonts palette to style the label; type the label text as desired (note, you can use the ‘%%’ intelligent label tag here).
  2. Right-click your new label and choose ‘Copy Label’ from the contextual menu.
  3. Select the feature(s) you want to label and choose Edit > Labels & Text > Paste Label from the main menu. The label and its properties will be applied to all the features you have selected.

To Edit the Style of Multiple Labels:

Properties applied to labels, such as Fonts, apply to all labels in the selection.

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Hold the Shift-key and click multiple labels, or hold the Command-key and click to select or deselect labels.
  • Choose Edit > Select All, then choose Edit > Labels & Text > Select All Labels.

3. Open the Fonts palette and change text styling. Properties applied to labels, such as Fonts, apply to all labels in the selection.

To Copy and Paste Labels:

To_Copy_and_Paste_Labels.png
  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Right-click onto a label and choose ‘Copy Label’ from the context menu.
  3. Select the receiving object or objects and choose Edit > Text & Labels > Paste Label from the main menu, or right-click and choose ‘Paste Label’ from the context menu.

HINT: An object can have multiple labels associated with it. For example, a symbol can have two separate labels positioned such that they do not overlap.

To Delete Labels:

  1. Select one or more objects to delete labels.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Edit > Labels & Text > Delete Label from the main menu.
  • Right-click a label and choose ‘Delete Label’ from the contextual menu.

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Text Labeling Linear Features

Ortelius’ connectable tracks are labeled with the help of the Linear Select tool. The label is placed in either the default style and positioned above the track, or its style and position will be based on the Label Adornment style that has been applied. Once placed, the label is fully editable. Labels follow the path of their associated linear features. If the path is moved, the label moves with it.

To Add Labels to Tracks:

To_Add_Labels_to_Tracks.png
  1. Choose the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the connectable track where your label will be placed.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.
  • Right-click the selected area and choose ‘New Label’ from the contextual menu. A highlighted label “bubble” shows where the label has been placed.
  • Double-click the label bubble to edit the label text as desired.

HINT: Labels support multi-line text. Press OPTION-Return or SHIFT-Return on the keyboard to manually insert a line break.

HINT: Linear Select and associated labels apply only to connectable tracks. To convert a path to a connectable track, select the path(s) and choose Graphic > Convert To > Connectable Track from the main menu. Line shapefiles features are imported as paths. If labels are desired, converting paths to tracks is a necessary step after importing. Some features, such as roads, it may be desirable to join multiple line segments.

About ‘Just-Right Positioning’ of Linear Feature Labels:

About__Just-Right_Positioning__of_Linear_Feature_Labels.png

Linear feature labels have handles for just-right positioning similar to the concept of handles with Bezier curves.

  • To control placement, the left handle (yellow diamond) slides the label along the track.
  • The right handle (orange diamond) controls the spread, or overall width, of the label along the line.
  • The handle on top (blue diamond) controls the vertical alignment of the label with respect to the line, moving the label up or down for perfect positioning.

To Flip a Label:

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Select the label and choose Edit > Labels & Text > Flip Label from the main menu.
  • Right-click on the label and choose ‘Flip Label’ to change the orientation of the label relative to the line.

To Smooth a Label on a Complex Track:

To_Smooth_a_Label_on_a_Complex_Track.png

As with other curved text, it is good practice to keep linear text labels as simple as possible. Usually this means selecting a relatively straight section of the line to place your label.

Do one of the following:

  • To place smoothly curved labels on lines with complex, sinuous routes, right-click the label and choose ‘Follow Trend Of Path’ to enable basic label simplification.
  • Right-click the label and choose ‘Detach From Feature’. The result is a Text On Path object. Adjust its curve handles as desired.

To Copy a Label to Multiple Tracks:

  1. Add a label to a track.
  2. Position and edit style and content as desired.
  3. Do one of the following:

Right-click the label and choose ‘Copy Label’ from the contextual menu.
Choose Edit > Labels & Text > Copy Label from the main menu.

4. Select other tracks.
5. Choose Edit > Labels & Text > Paste Label from the main menu. The label, including its content, style, and positioning, will be copied to the other features.

HINT: Multiple labels can be placed along a line. Each one can have its own style and placement, as appropriate to your map.

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Text Labeling Area Features

Shape objects accept labels in much the same way as point features. Simple shapes and shapes from imported shapefiles support labeling.

To Add Labels to Shapes:

To_Add_Labels_to_Shapes.png
  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select a shape.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Right click the shape and choose ‘New Label’ from the contextual menu. A label is placed at the visual center of the shape.
  • Choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.

3. The label content will use attribute information if an intelligent label tag has been defined. Alternatively, double-click the label to type free-text.

HINT: Labels support multi-line text. Press Option-Return or Shift-Return on the keyboard to manually insert a line break.

HINT: Special shapes, such as regular polygons and rounded-rectangles, and area features created from paths, such as irregular polygon, must be converted to shapes before they will accept a label. Choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu, or right-click the object and choose ‘Convert To Shape’ from the object’s contextual menu.

To Use Just-Right Positioning of Area Feature Labels:

To_Use_Just-Right_Positioning_of_Area_Feature_Labels.png

By default, labels are placed in the visual center of area features. The visual center provides for best placement when an area is irregular shaped. For example, the geometric center for Scotland is in water, the visually center places the label more where you would expect it.

  • Using the Select [s] tool, drag a label around the feature to move it. Labels subtly shift into ten standard click positions similar to labels on point features – eight positions around the shape, the geometric center point, and the visual center (which may be very close or the same as the geometric center).
  • Rotate a label by dragging its rotation handle. Hold the Shift-key while rotating to snap the angle to 15-degree increments.
  • To have full placement control while moving a label, hold the Shift-key and drag the label into the desired position. Like labeling other object types, it is easy to style a label then copy and paste it onto other objects. When a label is copied and pasted to other objects, its positioning, content, and text style properties are maintained.

HINT: Depending on a map’s scale, areas can represent point-like objects such as cities or islands. Move the label into an outside position in these cases.

To Spread (Tracking) Labels Across Area Features:

To_Spread__Tracking__Labels_Across_Area_Features.png

Text can be spread out across and area (called “tracking”).

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select the label text for editing.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Hold the Option-Control keys and repeatedly press the right-Arrow (end) key to widen (loosen) the spread, or the left-Arrow key to tighten the spread.
  • Choose Text > Kern > Loosen (or Tighten) from the main menu.

3. Repeat as necessary to get the desired spread.

HINT: Text > Kern > Loosen (or Tighten) is also used to add or delete space (or “kerning”) between two or more selected glyphs.

To Place Curved Text Across Area Features

To_Place_Curved_Text_Across_Area_Features.png

To create curved text for objects that span large areas, use the Text On Path [e] tool. Alternatively, you can convert a label to text on path with the following steps.

  1. Place a label on a shape.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Right-click the label and choose ‘Detach From Feature’ from the contextual menu. Note, the label will be completely detached from the feature and its attributes.
  • Select the label(s) and choose Edit > Labels & Text > Detach From Feature in the main menu.

3. Select and convert the text to ‘text on a path’ by right-clicking and choosing ‘Convert to > Text On Path’ or choose Graphic > Convert To > Text On Path from the main menu.
4. Move the text path end points and curve handles into proper position.
5. Text alignment should be “justified” to spread text across the path. As necessary, do one of the following:

  • Double-click the text for editing and click the ‘Justified’ text alignment icon in the format bar.
  • Choose Text > Justify from the main menu.
  • Open the Object Inspector’s Features pane and click the ‘Justified’ text alignment icon.

To Make Label Text Bigger, Smaller, Bold, Italic, Underline:

  1. Place a label on a shape.
  2. Select the text label.
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Open the Fonts palette and modify the text properties
  • Choose various Text > properties in the main menu.
  • Use shortcut keys to quickly modify label text properties. For example, Command- – and Command- = quickly make label text smaller or bigger.
  • Double-click the text for editing and choose text properties form the format bar.

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Intelligent Text Labeling with Attributes

An attribute is information that has been attributed to a feature, such as a river name, forest type, population value, house number, or country name. Attributes are commonly available with geographic information system (GIS) data.

Unlike standard graphic design software, Ortelius has the ability to store attribute information associated with each map feature. This information is stored behind the scenes in the Ortelius Object Inspector. Labels are able to use that attribute information. We call these “intelligent labels” because they automatically use attribute information, such as road names, if that information exists behind the scenes. Intelligent labeling works the same for point, line, and area labels.

To Place Intelligent Labels Using Attribute Information:

Intelligent labels are placed exactly the same way as free-text labels, without any bulky menus to get in the way.

  1. Add a label to a feature.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click to select the label for editing.
  3. In place of the label text, use a label tag (two percent signs “%%”) followed by the attribute identifier as a placeholder for the label’s value. For instance, “%%name” would auto-populate the label with the attribute “Name”. Label tag identifiers are not case sensitive (in other words, %%NAME returns the same result as %%Name).

HINT: If an attribute identifier contains a space in its name, quotation marks can be used in the attribute tag, e.g., %%”name 2″ will recognize the identifier whereas %%name 2 would interpret only “name” as the identifier.

To Combine Attribute Information on Labels Using Concatenate:

To_Combine_Attribute_Information_on_Labels_Using_Concaten.png

Concatenation – it’s a long word for something so easy. Creating labels that link together more than one attribute value (technically referred to as concatenation) is easily accomplished without complicated expressions.

  1. Add a label to a feature.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click to select the label for editing.
  3. In place of the label text, use a label tag. Write a statement using the ‘”%%identifier” of the attributes you want in the label, where “%%identifier” is the tag for the attribute value. Use spaces or other standard characters between words just as you would write them naturally. For example, as seen in the Object Inspector, “Name” “Number” and “Type” are different attributes of the selected feature. We use these three attributes for its label by entering “%%number %%name %%type” to have the label read “401 Market Street”.

To Use Label Codes:

To_Use_Label_Codes.png

The Ortelius labeling system is so flexible that you can be very specific with just a few codes. In the following example, we demonstrate just how easy it is to use only part of an attribute phrase, as well as replacing a label with all uppercase characters.

  1. Add a label to a feature.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click to select the label for editing.
  3. In place of the label text, use a label tag. Open the Object Inspector to see what attributes are available and their Identifier names. Use the “%%identifier” for intelligent labeling. In this example, the attribute value “Some pot holes”, where the label reads “Some”, so we type the attribute identifier “%%Condition” and tag it with “.1″, to return the corresponding first word in a phrase.

The following tag codes are available:

  • %%identifier.1, .2, .3, … .9 – Returns the corresponding first, second, third, etc. word of the attribute value up to 9
  • %%identifier.2 – Returns the second word of the attribute value
  • %%identifier.2.3 – Returns the second and third word of the attribute value (it is possible to combine tag codes)
  • %%identifier.E – Returns the end word of the attribute phrase
  • %%identifier.U – Returns an uppercase label
  • %%identifier.L – Returns a lowercase label
  • %%identifier.C – Returns a capitalized label
  • %%identifier.S – Returns a shortened (short) or abbreviated version of some common map words, including “St.” for street, “Rd.” for road, “Ln.” for lane, “St.” for saint, “Av.” for avenue, “Pk.” for park, “Cty.” for city, “pop.” for population”, “R.” for river, and “Is.” for island

Tag codes are a real problem solver. For example, if the attribute “Name” reads “State Road 65” but you want to label a road shield with just “65”, use the label identifier and code “%%name.E” to return the end word of the attribute phrase.

To Define Intelligent %% Label Templates in the Style Inspector:

To_Define_Intelligent____Label_Templates_in_the_Style_Ins.png

Label styles go hand-in-hand with the map’s styles and symbols. Unless otherwise defined, default labels are rendered with Helvetica font and sized proportionately to the size of the shape or symbol. Custom label templates are defined in the Style Inspector (and before an object is turned into a symbol). Labels use the underlying style from a Label Adornment as a template. See Creating New Symbols for steps to define a label template for a symbol.

Label Adornments can be a constant string of text, free text associated with a label, or text associated with an intelligent label. Some pre-defined tags are available from the ‘Tag” drop-down list. For example, choose the tag “Name” from the drop-down Tag list to automatically add the text adornment tag “%%Name”. If no attribute exists when labeling symbols on your map, the label template will still be applied and the new label will read “Label” ready for free-text editing.

Follow the instructions provided above to define a custom intelligent label using tags, tag codes, and concatenate.