Sharing Styles and Symbols

Easily import and export Collections from the Library Manager. The Mapdiva website now contains downloadable Collections shared by Mapdiva, LLC and other Ortelius users. Visit our Shop to explore what’s available.

To Open the Library Manager:

To_Open_the_Library_Manager.png

Do one of the following:

  • Choose Window > Library Manager from the main menu.
  • Click the Library Manager icon in the toolbar (note, the Library Manager icon is not in the toolbar by default and can be added by customizing the toolbar).
  • Use the Command-5 keyboard shortcut.

To Import Symbol Collections From Others:

To_Import_Symbol_Collections_From_Others.png
  1. Download & unzip the file as necessary.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose “Import Collection…” from the Library Manager – Action Menu (looks like a gear). The collection will be imported into My Library and displayed, or
  • In the Finder, double-click the unzipped symbols file to automatically launch Ortelius and install the collection.

To Export Symbol Collections:

  1. In the Library Manager, choose the user collection to be exported.
  2. Choose “Export Collection…” from the Library Manager – Action Menu (looks like a gear). The collection s exported as a zipped Ortelius symbol collection file with the name and to the location you specify.

Using the Ortelius Fonts Panel

Text is styled directly through the Fonts panel and Text commands in the main menu. With one or more text objects selected, open the Fonts panel. As desired, choose the font and associated style elements, such as size, color, and shadow. Alternatively, colors can be dropped on text objects directly from the Colors panel.

To Open the Fonts Panel:

To_Open_the_Fonts_Panel.png

Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Fonts icon in the toolbar.
  • Choose Text > Show Fonts from the main menu.

To Use the Fonts Panel:

To_Use_the_Fonts_Panel.png
  1. Choose one or more text object.
  2. Use the Fonts panel to choose typefaces, font sizes, and other font formatting, including text shadows and strikethrough.

Here is a summary of the text effects buttons, from left to right across the top:

  • Text Underline pop-up menu to choose an underline style (such as single or double).
  • Text Strikethrough pop-up menu to choose a strikethrough style (such as single or double).
  • Text Color pop-up menu to apply a color to text.
  • Text Shadow button to apply a shadow to selected text.
  • Shadow Opacity, Shadow Blur, Shadow Off set, and Shadow Angle controls affect the appearance of the shadow.

To Set Outlined and Masked Text in the Object Inspector:

To_Set_Outlined_and_Masked_Text_in_the_Object_Inspector.png

Use the Object Inspector to add advanced styling, including text outline and text mask. Text outline and masking are particularly useful for making text stand out on top of dark, colored, or complex backgrounds.

  1. Make text active for editing.
  2. Open the Object Inspector.
  3. Do one of the following:
  • To outline text, use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the outline thckness as a percentage of font size. Click the color well to change the outline color.
  • To mask text, use the slider, highlight the text and type, or use the up/down arrows to adjust the mask (knockout) size as a percentage of font size. Click the color well to change the mask color.

HINT: Masking can be any color as well as semi-transparent, and the size of the mask is fully adjustable.

Working with Text Objects

Several text formatting options are available through the main menu. Choose Text > to choose from styles, alignment, case, kerning, and more. The Fonts panel offers font selection and custom effects, including outline, shadow, and mask. Align, tighten and loosen kerning, change case and baseline are available menu options and keyboard shortcuts. Font effects and options can be applied to blocks of text, individual words, and and even individual glyphs. For full creative control, text can be converted to a graphic shape or path to allow any drawing manipulation.

To Add and Edit Text:

To_Add_and_Edit_Text.png
  1. Choose the Text [t] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Click on your drawing canvas to place the text box.
  • Press and drag to place a custom size text box.

3. Begin typing.
4. To end typing, do one of the following:

  • Click on the drawing canvas to place another text box.
  • Click the Esc-key to end typing and return to the Select tool.
  • Choose the Select tool or another drawing tool.

HINT: If you prefer to have the Return-key end editing, disable (uncheck) ‘Return-key inserts a new line when editing text boxes’ in the Artboard > Preferences… Editing pane; while disabled, use SHIFT-Return-key to insert a new line in multi-line text.

To Edit Existing Text:

  1. Double-click existing text with the Select [s] tool to make the text active for editing.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Start typing to replace the selected text.
  • Click to place the cursor within the selected text to insert new text.

3. Click outside of the text box, or the Esc-key, to end editing.

To Expand the Text Box When Some Content is Hidden:

To_Expand_the_Text_Box_When_Some_Content_is_Hidden.png

When text extends beyond the confines of the text box an indicator “+” is shown in the lower right-hand corner of the text box prompting you to enlarge it.

HINT: Text in a box will not be visible if the font size is larger than the text box. Use the sizing handles on the text box to make it bigger, or right-click the text box and choose ‘Fit To Text’ from the contextual menu.

To Add Text On a Path:

To_Add_Text_On_a_Path.png

Artboard makes curved text beautifully. A bit of practice is all it takes to give your curved text an expert look. Text On Path uses curves with the same controls as the Path tool.

  1. Choose the Text Path [e] tool.
  2. Press and drag to place the starting point for your text on a path, release the cursor and continue placing points along the curve.
  3. Double click (or hit ESC-key) to end the path.
  4. Begin typing.
  5. To end typing, do one of the following:
  • Click on the drawing canvas to place another text path.
  • Click the Esc-key to end typing and return to the Select tool.

6. With the Select [s] tool, adjust the curve handles as desired.

HINT: It is a good practice to keep your text curves simple. With only two points you can create smooth c-shaped and s-shaped curves simply by adjusting the points themselves (the orange dots) and the curve handles (the blue squares). The longer the curve handles, the steeper your curve. Experiment by moving the curve handles around and altering the shape of the curve.

To Edit Text on a Path:

To_Edit_Text_on_a_Path.png
  1. Double-click the text with the Select [s] tool to edit (make sure you click onto a letter when double-clicking to recognize the selection).
  2. When selected, the text to be edited will float above the path and be highlighted.
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Start typing to replace the selected text.
  • Click to place the cursor within the selected text to insert new text.

4. Open the Font panel to change the font and appearance of text.

To Change Text Alignment Along the Path:

To_Change_Text_Alignment_Along_the_Path.png

Text On Path has “Justified” alignment by default, giving it a stretched appearance across the entire length of the path.

  • Choose Text > Align > Left / Right / Justified / Center to change text along a path to your desired alignment.

Flipping Upside-down Text:

Flipping_Upside-down_Text.png

Like normal paths, Text On Path has a direction from its start point to its end point. Text On Path follows the direction of the path – typically reading from left to right.

  1. To draw text upside-down, start the path from right to left.
  2. To flip text that is upside-down, choose Edit > Path > Reverse from the main menu.

To Fit Text to a Shape (for example a circle)

To_Fit_Text_to_a_Shape__for_example_a_circle_.png

In addition to drawing a Bezier curve with the Text Path tool, you can fit text to any shape.

  1. Use the Text Path [e] tool to place your text on your drawing canvas (don’t worry about the shape of the path).
  2. Begin typing.
  3. To end typing, do one of the following:
  • Click the Esc-key to end typing and return to the Select tool.
  • Choose another drawing tool.

4. Next, draw your shape.
5. While the shape is sected, copy it to the clipboard.
6. Select the text and choose Edit > Paste Text Clipping Path from the main menu. The text will now follow the path of the object.

HINT: To wrap text only partially around a circle, use the Arc tool to draw an arc to the desired length and paste it onto your text using the above method.

To Use Spreading (or Tracking) on Text:

To_Use_Spreading__or_Tracking__on_Text.png

Text can be spread out across and area (called “tracking”).

  1. Select the text.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Hold the Option-Command keys and repeatedly pressing the right Arrow (end) key to spread text.
  • Choose Text > Kern > Loosen from the main menu. Repeat as necessary to get a wide spread.
  • Hold the Option-Command keys and repeatedly pressing the left Arrow (end) key to tighten tracking.
  • Choose Text > Kern > Tighten from the main menu. Repeat as necessary to tighten the spread.
  • Choose Text > Kern > Use Default from the main menu to reset to the original tracking.

HINT: Tracking command may also used to add (or tighten) space between selected letters, rather than the entire text box or path.

To Make Text Bigger, Smaller, Bold, Italic, and Underline:

To_Make_Text_Bigger__Smaller__Bold__Italic__and_Underline.png

Modify text properties in the Fonts panel, or by choosing various Text > options in the main menu. Use the convenient keyboard shortcuts to quickly modify text properties.

Need multi-styled text? Text boxes can use multiple fonts, sizes, colors, and more in a single text box.

  1. Make text active for editing.
  2. Press and drag to highlight individual text or words for editing.
  3. Open the Font panel to change the font and appearance of text.

To Edit Text and Text Properties in the Object Inspector:

To_Edit_Text_and_Text_Properties_in_the_Object_Inspector.png

The Object Inspector provides a controlled environment for text box editing, styling, layout, alignment and advanced styling.

  • The text well in the Object Inspector shows the selected text, which can be edited directly or from this interface.
  • Layout and vertical alignment controls are available for text-box and text on path.
  • Variable vertical alignment is further controlled with the slider bar.
  • Wrap lines is the default setting and enables a long string of text to flow to multiple lines within the text box.
  • Angle and text justification settings are available.
  • Click onto the color wells to change font, outline, and mask colors.
  • The “A” font button opens the Fonts palette, further enabling font and font size settings from this interface.
  • Advanced styling includes text outline and text mask.

To Make Shape Objects from Text and True Type Fonts:

To_Make_Shape_Objects_from_Text_and_True_Type_Fonts.png

Text and True Type Fonts (TTF) can be converted into individual editable shape objects. These new shape objects can be further styled, grouped, and saved as clip art as desired.

  1. Place text in the drawing area using the Text Box tool. Choose the font you want to use, or choose Edit > Special Characters from the main menu to open the Special Characters window.
  2. After typing, select the text box and choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape or Graphic > Convert To > Shape Group from the main menu (or right click and choose ‘Convert To…’ from the contextual menu). When converted to shape, the entire block of text is one shape. When converted to shape group, you can Ungroup to obtain each glyph as a separate object.
  3. To further explode and modify multi-layered objects, choose Graphic > Combine > Break Apart from the main menu and modify the shape or re-color individual components.

How to Use Text Styles

Text on a map often serves the role of symbol, indicating important features and helping to distinguish features from each other. Like styles and symbols, text for features should share the same text style. For example, it is traditional to represent natural features on a map with serif fonts and cultural features with sans-serif fonts. Ortelius comes loaded with Text styles designed to work together for mapping. Text for roads, rivers, oceans and more are included.

Ortelius saves text effects to be easily applied later. Use the Fonts panel to edit fonts and create ad-hoc text styles. Use the Style Dropper to pick up text styles from one text object and apply them to others. Use the Style Inspector to save text styles for future use.

To Apply Text Styles:

To_Apply_Text_Styles.png
  1. Choose a Text tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose a text style from the Styles & Symbols palette, then place your text.
  • Select text that is in your drawing and double-click a text style in the Styles & Symbols palette to apply.

To Create a Style for a Text Object:

  1. Choose the Text [t] or Text Path [e] tool.
  2. Place your text.
  3. With the text selected, use the Fonts panel to edit the style properties.

To Reset the Text Style to the Default:

With the Text [t] or Text Path [e] tool active, or with a text object selected, do one of the following:

  • Click the ‘Reset’ button in the Format Bar to reset to the default style (Helvetica Regular 14pt).
  • Click the ‘Reset’ button in the Style Inspector to reset to the default style (Helvetica Regular 14pt).

To Add Text Using Existing Text Styles:

  1. Open the Styles & Clip Art palette.
  2. Choose the Text [t] or Text Path [e] tool from the Tools palette.
  3. Choose a text style from the Styles & Clip Art palette.
  4. Add your text.
  5. Continue adding text objects as desired (subsequent text objects have the same style properties until they are changed).
  6. Click the Esc-key to end editing and return to the Select tool, or choose the Select [s] tool from the main menu.

To change text styles, click once onto a different text style in the Styles & Clip Art palette and continue.

To Apply a Different Text Style to Existing Text:

With the text object selected, do one of the following:

  • Double-click a text style from the Styles & Clip Art palette.
  • In the Fonts Panel, edit the style properties as desired.
  • Click the ‘Reset’ button in the Format Bar (or Style Inspector) to reset to the default text style, edit the text style as desired.

To “Quick Pick-up” Another Text Object’s Style while Placing Text:

  1. Choose the Text [t] tool.
  2. Hold the CMND-key to activate the Style Dropper without switching tools.
  3. With the cursor (it will look like an empty style dropper), click a text object with the text style to be picked up.
  4. Release the CMND-key and continue.

To Copy a Text Style From a Existing Text to Another:

  1. Choose the Style Dropper [d] tool.
  2. With the cursor (it will look like an empty style dropper), click a text object that you want to pick up its style.
  3. With the cursor (it will look like a full style dropper), click a text object(s) that you want to receive the style.
  4. To pick up a different text style while the Style Dropper tool is still active, press the OPTION/Alt key while clicking a text object.
  5. Alternatively, do the following:
  • With the text object selected, right-click and choose ‘Copy Style…’ from the contextual menu, right-click a text object to receive the style and choose ‘Paste Style…’ from the contextual menu.

To Copy a Text Style from One Text Object to Multiple Text Objects:

Do one of the following:

  • Right-click the text object with the style to be picked up and choose ‘Copy Style…’ from the contextual menu, choose the Select [s] tool and select the text objects to receive the style, choose Edit > Style > Paste Style… from the main menu.
  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select a text object with the style to be copied, choose Edit > Style > Copy Style… from the main menu, select the text objects to receive the style, choose Edit > Style > Paste Style… from the main menu.

To Save a Text Style to the Library:

Optionally, use the Style Inspector to name your text style and add it to “My Collection…” for future use.

  1. Open the Style Inspector.
  2. Add text and use the Fonts panel to define its style properties.
  3. In the Style Inspector, with the text object still selected, click onto the ad-hoc style name, highlight it and type a new text style name.
  4. Optionally, click the text ‘Optional description’ and type a description for your new style.
  5. Click the ‘Add to User’s Collection…’ button. The Library Manager is launched and the text style is added to My Library > My Collection.

New styles are immediately available in the Styles & Clip Art Palette where you can use them when placing text.

Using Map Text Labels

Labels go hand-in-hand with the map’s styles and symbols, so of course we’ve designed them to work together. Unlike ordinary text placed with the Text tools, labels are attached to map features. If the feature moves, the label moves with it. Labels make naming map features easy with intelligent naming, advanced styling, and just-right positioning.

Ortelius’ labeling system opens a new chapter in WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) feature labeling. No more going through multi-level menus and dialogs to turn on labels and change settings, only to have to repeat the process multiple times to get the right look. Direct feature labeling provides a revolutionary way to add and edit labels – directly on your map.

About Labels with Style:

About_Labels_with_Style.png

Ortelius is loaded with hundreds of styles and symbols. Styles not only define the look of lines and areas, they can also define the initial style for labels. So, when you place a river using a river style, the river’s label style is already designed for you. As always, label styles are fully editable directly on the map, and you can easily create and share your own custom styles using the Style Inspector.

Changing a label directly will not over-write the Library style, rather these changed labels will be saved as “ad-hoc” styles unless they are created using the Style Inspector and added to the Library. Use ad-hoc styles when their use will be occasional. Use Library styles and symbols when they will be used repeatedly or need to be used later in other maps.

Changing label text styles is similar to changing them on simple text objects. Select the label(s) and edit the font in the Fonts palette. This method can be used with multiple labels at one time.

To Select Labels:

To_Select_Labels.png

Selected labels are shown using bubble-shaped highlights to distinguish the label selection from other kinds of selections in your drawing.

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Click onto an object label to select it.
  • To select multiple labels, hold the Shift-key and click additional labels, or hold the Command-key and click to select or deselect labels.
  • Double-click to make the label active for editing.

To Show (or Hide) Labels:

To_Show__or_Hide__Labels.png

Labels can be turned on or off (visible or hidden) on your map.

Do one of the following:

  • Selecting the labeled feature(s) and choosing Edit > Labels & Text > Hide(Show) Labels from the main menu.
  • Choose Edit > Select All and then Hide Labels to turn off all labels on a layer.

About Labels for Symbols, Tracks, and Shapes:

About_Labels_for_Symbols__Tracks__and_Shapes.png

Each feature type – lines, points, and areas – has context-sensitive positioning for labels. For example, symbol labels for point features can be placed in one of nine standard positions around and at the center point (the upper-right position is the default). Track labels follow linear features and are positioned above, on, or below the line. Area feature labels are placed at the visual center of the shape.

Labels can also be moved into any position around the symbol by simply holding the Shift-key on the keyboard while moving it into the perfect position. Optional leader-lines can be added by right-clicking the label and choosing “Show Leader Line.” Of course, if it is ever needed, you can always right-click the label and choose “Detach Label” to move it anywhere (the label will be completely detached from the feature and its attributes, and become an ordinary text object).

Free-text labels may be added to any point symbol, track, or shape object. Simple shapes, connectable tracks, symbols, and shapes from imported shapefiles support labeling. If you have an area object created with another drawing tool, for instance an irregular polygon, select the object and choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu, or right-click the object and choose Convert To Shape.

To Add Free-Text Labels:

To_Add_Free-Text_Labels.png
  1. Do one of the following:
  • Select the symbol(s) or shape(s) and choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu. If the feature has attribute information behind it that includes the feature’s name, the label may automatically detect and label the feature with its name. Otherwise, the word “Label” will be inserted for editing.
  • For a single object, right-click and choose ‘New Label’ from the context menu.

2. With the Select [s] tool, double-click the label to select it. You may see a code starting with “%%” highlighted – ignore this tag and type a free-text label with the text you want. As with simple text objects, double-click the label to edit it any time.

HINT: Special shapes, such as stars, arcs, and rounded-rectangles must be converted to regular shapes before a label can be added. Select the special shape and choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu, or right-click and choose ‘Convert To Shape’ from the contextual menu.

To Label Multiple Features:

The power of Ortelius’ labeling system includes swift labeling of the features you want – all features or just a select few. Manually adding a label to each feature is not necessary.

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Select the features you want to label and choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.

HINT: To select the features you want labeled hold down the SHIFT key and click each object with the Select tool, or use Edit > Select All to select all features on a layer, or use Ortelius’ advanced search to select specific features (for example, to select and label cities with populations over 100,000). Then choose Edit > Labels & Text > Paste Label from the main menu.

To Create an Ad-Hoc Label to Apply to Multiple Objects:

  1. Add a label to a feature and use the Fonts palette to style the label; type the label text as desired (note, you can use the ‘%%’ intelligent label tag here).
  2. Right-click your new label and choose ‘Copy Label’ from the contextual menu.
  3. Select the feature(s) you want to label and choose Edit > Labels & Text > Paste Label from the main menu. The label and its properties will be applied to all the features you have selected.

To Edit the Style of Multiple Labels:

Properties applied to labels, such as Fonts, apply to all labels in the selection.

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Hold the Shift-key and click multiple labels, or hold the Command-key and click to select or deselect labels.
  • Choose Edit > Select All, then choose Edit > Labels & Text > Select All Labels.

3. Open the Fonts palette and change text styling. Properties applied to labels, such as Fonts, apply to all labels in the selection.

To Copy and Paste Labels:

To_Copy_and_Paste_Labels.png
  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Right-click onto a label and choose ‘Copy Label’ from the context menu.
  3. Select the receiving object or objects and choose Edit > Text & Labels > Paste Label from the main menu, or right-click and choose ‘Paste Label’ from the context menu.

HINT: An object can have multiple labels associated with it. For example, a symbol can have two separate labels positioned such that they do not overlap.

To Delete Labels:

  1. Select one or more objects to delete labels.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Edit > Labels & Text > Delete Label from the main menu.
  • Right-click a label and choose ‘Delete Label’ from the contextual menu.

Text Labeling Linear Features

Ortelius’ connectable tracks are labeled with the help of the Linear Select tool. The label is placed in either the default style and positioned above the track, or its style and position will be based on the Label Adornment style that has been applied. Once placed, the label is fully editable. Labels follow the path of their associated linear features. If the path is moved, the label moves with it.

To Add Labels to Tracks:

To_Add_Labels_to_Tracks.png
  1. Choose the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the connectable track where your label will be placed.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.
  • Right-click the selected area and choose ‘New Label’ from the contextual menu. A highlighted label “bubble” shows where the label has been placed.
  • Double-click the label bubble to edit the label text as desired.

HINT: Labels support multi-line text. Press OPTION-Return or SHIFT-Return on the keyboard to manually insert a line break.

HINT: Linear Select and associated labels apply only to connectable tracks. To convert a path to a connectable track, select the path(s) and choose Graphic > Convert To > Connectable Track from the main menu. Line shapefiles features are imported as paths. If labels are desired, converting paths to tracks is a necessary step after importing. Some features, such as roads, it may be desirable to join multiple line segments.

About ‘Just-Right Positioning’ of Linear Feature Labels:

About__Just-Right_Positioning__of_Linear_Feature_Labels.png

Linear feature labels have handles for just-right positioning similar to the concept of handles with Bezier curves.

  • To control placement, the left handle (yellow diamond) slides the label along the track.
  • The right handle (orange diamond) controls the spread, or overall width, of the label along the line.
  • The handle on top (blue diamond) controls the vertical alignment of the label with respect to the line, moving the label up or down for perfect positioning.

To Flip a Label:

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Select the label and choose Edit > Labels & Text > Flip Label from the main menu.
  • Right-click on the label and choose ‘Flip Label’ to change the orientation of the label relative to the line.

To Smooth a Label on a Complex Track:

To_Smooth_a_Label_on_a_Complex_Track.png

As with other curved text, it is good practice to keep linear text labels as simple as possible. Usually this means selecting a relatively straight section of the line to place your label.

Do one of the following:

  • To place smoothly curved labels on lines with complex, sinuous routes, right-click the label and choose ‘Follow Trend Of Path’ to enable basic label simplification.
  • Right-click the label and choose ‘Detach From Feature’. The result is a Text On Path object. Adjust its curve handles as desired.

To Copy a Label to Multiple Tracks:

  1. Add a label to a track.
  2. Position and edit style and content as desired.
  3. Do one of the following:

Right-click the label and choose ‘Copy Label’ from the contextual menu.
Choose Edit > Labels & Text > Copy Label from the main menu.

4. Select other tracks.
5. Choose Edit > Labels & Text > Paste Label from the main menu. The label, including its content, style, and positioning, will be copied to the other features.

HINT: Multiple labels can be placed along a line. Each one can have its own style and placement, as appropriate to your map.

Text Labeling Point Features

Many of Ortelius’ preloaded symbols have Text Adornment label templates defined, and labels will initially adopt the underlying text adornment style properties. Custom label styles are defined in the Style Inspector before a graphic is turned into a symbol. Like linear and area labels, a highlighted label “bubble” shows where the label has been placed. By default, labels are sized proportionately to the size of the map symbol.

To Add Labels to Symbols:

To_Add_Labels_to_Symbols.png
  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Right-click a symbol and choose ‘New Label’ from the contextual menu.
  • Select one or more symbols and choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.

HINT: Labels support multi-line text. Press Option-Return or Shift-Return on the keyboard to manually insert a line break.

To Edit Point Feature Labels:

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool.
  2. Double-click the label to edit the label text.

To Achieve Just-Right Positioning of Point Feature Labels:

To_Achieve_Just-Right_Positioning_of_Point_Feature_Labels.png

Just-right positioning means perfect placement every time. Initial label placement is the upper right-hand corner of the symbol.

  1. Add a label to a symbol.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • With the symbol selected, press and drag the label to reposition it in any of eight standard positions surrounding the symbol, or positioned on center. The label will snap into position. Rotated a label by dragging its rotation handle. Hold the Shift-key while rotating to snap the angle to 15-degree increments.
  • Labels can also be moved into any position around the symbol. Hold the Shift-key while moving the label into the perfect position.

3. Optional leader-lines can be added. Right-click the label and choose ‘Show Leader Line’ from the contextual menu.

HINT: Of course, if it is ever needed, you can always right-click the label and choose ‘Detach Label’ to move it anywhere (the label will be completely detached from the feature and its attributes and become an ordinary text object).

Text Labeling Area Features

Shape objects accept labels in much the same way as point features. Simple shapes and shapes from imported shapefiles support labeling.

To Add Labels to Shapes:

To_Add_Labels_to_Shapes.png
  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select a shape.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Right click the shape and choose ‘New Label’ from the contextual menu. A label is placed at the visual center of the shape.
  • Choose Edit > Labels & Text > New Label from the main menu.

3. The label content will use attribute information if an intelligent label tag has been defined. Alternatively, double-click the label to type free-text.

HINT: Labels support multi-line text. Press Option-Return or Shift-Return on the keyboard to manually insert a line break.

HINT: Special shapes, such as regular polygons and rounded-rectangles, and area features created from paths, such as irregular polygon, must be converted to shapes before they will accept a label. Choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu, or right-click the object and choose ‘Convert To Shape’ from the object’s contextual menu.

To Use Just-Right Positioning of Area Feature Labels:

To_Use_Just-Right_Positioning_of_Area_Feature_Labels.png

By default, labels are placed in the visual center of area features. The visual center provides for best placement when an area is irregular shaped. For example, the geometric center for Scotland is in water, the visually center places the label more where you would expect it.

  • Using the Select [s] tool, drag a label around the feature to move it. Labels subtly shift into ten standard click positions similar to labels on point features – eight positions around the shape, the geometric center point, and the visual center (which may be very close or the same as the geometric center).
  • Rotate a label by dragging its rotation handle. Hold the Shift-key while rotating to snap the angle to 15-degree increments.
  • To have full placement control while moving a label, hold the Shift-key and drag the label into the desired position. Like labeling other object types, it is easy to style a label then copy and paste it onto other objects. When a label is copied and pasted to other objects, its positioning, content, and text style properties are maintained.

HINT: Depending on a map’s scale, areas can represent point-like objects such as cities or islands. Move the label into an outside position in these cases.

To Spread (Tracking) Labels Across Area Features:

To_Spread__Tracking__Labels_Across_Area_Features.png

Text can be spread out across and area (called “tracking”).

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select the label text for editing.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Hold the Option-Control keys and repeatedly press the right-Arrow (end) key to widen (loosen) the spread, or the left-Arrow key to tighten the spread.
  • Choose Text > Kern > Loosen (or Tighten) from the main menu.

3. Repeat as necessary to get the desired spread.

HINT: Text > Kern > Loosen (or Tighten) is also used to add or delete space (or “kerning”) between two or more selected glyphs.

To Place Curved Text Across Area Features

To_Place_Curved_Text_Across_Area_Features.png

To create curved text for objects that span large areas, use the Text On Path [e] tool. Alternatively, you can convert a label to text on path with the following steps.

  1. Place a label on a shape.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Right-click the label and choose ‘Detach From Feature’ from the contextual menu. Note, the label will be completely detached from the feature and its attributes.
  • Select the label(s) and choose Edit > Labels & Text > Detach From Feature in the main menu.

3. Select and convert the text to ‘text on a path’ by right-clicking and choosing ‘Convert to > Text On Path’ or choose Graphic > Convert To > Text On Path from the main menu.
4. Move the text path end points and curve handles into proper position.
5. Text alignment should be “justified” to spread text across the path. As necessary, do one of the following:

  • Double-click the text for editing and click the ‘Justified’ text alignment icon in the format bar.
  • Choose Text > Justify from the main menu.
  • Open the Object Inspector’s Features pane and click the ‘Justified’ text alignment icon.

To Make Label Text Bigger, Smaller, Bold, Italic, Underline:

  1. Place a label on a shape.
  2. Select the text label.
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Open the Fonts palette and modify the text properties
  • Choose various Text > properties in the main menu.
  • Use shortcut keys to quickly modify label text properties. For example, Command- – and Command- = quickly make label text smaller or bigger.
  • Double-click the text for editing and choose text properties form the format bar.

Intelligent Text Labeling with Attributes

An attribute is information that has been attributed to a feature, such as a river name, forest type, population value, house number, or country name. Attributes are commonly available with geographic information system (GIS) data.

Unlike standard graphic design software, Ortelius has the ability to store attribute information associated with each map feature. This information is stored behind the scenes in the Ortelius Object Inspector. Labels are able to use that attribute information. We call these “intelligent labels” because they automatically use attribute information, such as road names, if that information exists behind the scenes. Intelligent labeling works the same for point, line, and area labels.

To Place Intelligent Labels Using Attribute Information:

Intelligent labels are placed exactly the same way as free-text labels, without any bulky menus to get in the way.

  1. Add a label to a feature.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click to select the label for editing.
  3. In place of the label text, use a label tag (two percent signs “%%”) followed by the attribute identifier as a placeholder for the label’s value. For instance, “%%name” would auto-populate the label with the attribute “Name”. Label tag identifiers are not case sensitive (in other words, %%NAME returns the same result as %%Name).

HINT: If an attribute identifier contains a space in its name, quotation marks can be used in the attribute tag, e.g., %%”name 2″ will recognize the identifier whereas %%name 2 would interpret only “name” as the identifier.

To Combine Attribute Information on Labels Using Concatenate:

To_Combine_Attribute_Information_on_Labels_Using_Concaten.png

Concatenation – it’s a long word for something so easy. Creating labels that link together more than one attribute value (technically referred to as concatenation) is easily accomplished without complicated expressions.

  1. Add a label to a feature.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click to select the label for editing.
  3. In place of the label text, use a label tag. Write a statement using the ‘”%%identifier” of the attributes you want in the label, where “%%identifier” is the tag for the attribute value. Use spaces or other standard characters between words just as you would write them naturally. For example, as seen in the Object Inspector, “Name” “Number” and “Type” are different attributes of the selected feature. We use these three attributes for its label by entering “%%number %%name %%type” to have the label read “401 Market Street”.

To Use Label Codes:

To_Use_Label_Codes.png

The Ortelius labeling system is so flexible that you can be very specific with just a few codes. In the following example, we demonstrate just how easy it is to use only part of an attribute phrase, as well as replacing a label with all uppercase characters.

  1. Add a label to a feature.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click to select the label for editing.
  3. In place of the label text, use a label tag. Open the Object Inspector to see what attributes are available and their Identifier names. Use the “%%identifier” for intelligent labeling. In this example, the attribute value “Some pot holes”, where the label reads “Some”, so we type the attribute identifier “%%Condition” and tag it with “.1″, to return the corresponding first word in a phrase.

The following tag codes are available:

  • %%identifier.1, .2, .3, … .9 – Returns the corresponding first, second, third, etc. word of the attribute value up to 9
  • %%identifier.2 – Returns the second word of the attribute value
  • %%identifier.2.3 – Returns the second and third word of the attribute value (it is possible to combine tag codes)
  • %%identifier.E – Returns the end word of the attribute phrase
  • %%identifier.U – Returns an uppercase label
  • %%identifier.L – Returns a lowercase label
  • %%identifier.C – Returns a capitalized label
  • %%identifier.S – Returns a shortened (short) or abbreviated version of some common map words, including “St.” for street, “Rd.” for road, “Ln.” for lane, “St.” for saint, “Av.” for avenue, “Pk.” for park, “Cty.” for city, “pop.” for population”, “R.” for river, and “Is.” for island

Tag codes are a real problem solver. For example, if the attribute “Name” reads “State Road 65” but you want to label a road shield with just “65”, use the label identifier and code “%%name.E” to return the end word of the attribute phrase.

To Define Intelligent %% Label Templates in the Style Inspector:

To_Define_Intelligent____Label_Templates_in_the_Style_Ins.png

Label styles go hand-in-hand with the map’s styles and symbols. Unless otherwise defined, default labels are rendered with Helvetica font and sized proportionately to the size of the shape or symbol. Custom label templates are defined in the Style Inspector (and before an object is turned into a symbol). Labels use the underlying style from a Label Adornment as a template. See Creating New Symbols for steps to define a label template for a symbol.

Label Adornments can be a constant string of text, free text associated with a label, or text associated with an intelligent label. Some pre-defined tags are available from the ‘Tag” drop-down list. For example, choose the tag “Name” from the drop-down Tag list to automatically add the text adornment tag “%%Name”. If no attribute exists when labeling symbols on your map, the label template will still be applied and the new label will read “Label” ready for free-text editing.

Follow the instructions provided above to define a custom intelligent label using tags, tag codes, and concatenate.

Using Lists in Your Map Layout

Ortelius text boxes may contain bulleted lists. Create new lists, or copy and paste a list into a text box.

To Copy & Paste Lists:

To_Copy___Paste_Lists.png
  1. Choose the Text Box [t] tool and add a text box to your drawing.
  2. Copy content other source documents. For example, this list is copied directly from the geography.about.com website.
  3. Double-click the text box for editing and paste your content (use the keyboard shortcut CMND-V or choose Edit > Paste from the main menu).
  4. As needed, drag the handles on the text box to resize it to fit your text (or right-click to use the context menu ‘Fit To Text’ command).

To Create a New List:

To_Create_a_New_List.png
  1. Choose the Text Box [t] tool and add a text box to your drawing.
  2. Type text into the text box, using the Return-key to go to the next line for each item in the list.
  3. As needed, drag the text box handles to resize to fit your text.
  4. Using the Select [s] tool, select the list text and choose Text > List from the main menu. A List menu appears enabling a variety of bullet and numbering options. Choose your list settings.

5. Text alignment should be “right” or as desired. As necessary, do one of the following:

  • Double-click the text for editing and click the ‘Right’ text alignment icon in the format bar.
  • Choose Text > Right from the main menu.
  • Open the Object Inspector’s Features pane and click the ‘Right’ text alignment icon.

HINT: Backspacing can be used to remove individual bullets.

The Ortelius Image Browser

The Image Browser provides quick access to your iPhoto, Pictures folder, and Smart folders, and you can attach other folders as desired. Import PNG, JPG, non-editable PDF, and TIFF images as well as vector SVG files into your Artboard drawings. Imported SVG are fully editable vector graphics.

Images can be masked, cropped, scaled, enhanced, and more! See Working With Images for details.

To Open the Image Browser:

Do one of the following:

  • Click the Image Browser icon in the toolbar.
  • Choose File > Image Browser from the menu.

To Import Images from the Image Browser:

To_Import_Images_from_the_Image_Browser.png
  1. Drag images from the Image Browser directly to your drawing canvas. If an image is larger than the drawing canvas size, it will be scaled to fit the canvas (though can be rescaled in the Geometry panel).
  2. Select a root folder or iPhoto folder to browse images.
  3. To add folders, click the “+” button and navigate to the folder to browse, or to remove a folder from the list, select it and click the ‘-‘ button.

To Import SVG from the Image Browser:

To_Import_SVG_from_the_Image_Browser.png
  1. Similar to images, simply drag editable vector SVG 1.1 files from the Image Browser to your drawing canvas.
  2. Ungroup as needed to edit.

Working with Images in Ortelius

To Adjust Image Size and Rotation:

media_1391792533674.png

Do one of the following:

  • Using the Select [s] tool, drag the sizing handles located around the outside edges of the image bounding box. Hold the Shift-key while dragging to constrain the aspect ratio.
  • Drag the direct rotate handle located to the right of the center point. Note the center point (light blue cross-hair) can be moved to reposition the rotation centroid. Hold the SHIFT-key while rotating to constrain the rotation angle to 15-degree increments.
  • With the image selected, enter numeric dimensions for object width, height, and/or rotation in the Geometry pane.

To Mask (and Crop) Images:

To_Mask__and_Crop__Images.png
  1. Using the Select [s] tool, double-click the image to make it active for editing. The bounding box is highlighted with a dashed line.
  2. Move any of the image’s bounding box handles to adjust the bounding box.
  3. Press and drag the image to reposition it within its bounding box.
  4. Drag the slider up or down to resize (scale) the image within its bounding box.
  5. Click off of the image to finish editing.

HINT: Image Mask is non-destructive. To return to the original image bounding box, right-click the image and choose “Fit To Image” from the contextual menu.
HINT: To permanently crop and resample the image to fit the new bounding box, right-click and choose “Crop and Resample” from the contextual menu.

To Clip an Image Using a Shape:

To_Clip_an_Image_Using_a_Shape.png
  1. Place the image in your drawing.
  2. Draw any shape to be the clipping shape – from a simple shape to a complex outline of the area you want to clip.
  3. Overlap the shape over the image.
  4. Select both the image and shape and do one of the following:
  • Choose Graphic > Combine > Intersect from the main menu.
  • Click the Intersect icon on the toolbar.
  • Use the Shift-Command-I keyboard shortcut.

HINT: Clipping an image with a shape is non-destructive. To return to the original image bounding box, right-clicking the image and choose “Remove Image Clipping Path” from the contextual menu.
HINT: To permanently crop and resample a clipped image , right click and choose “Crop and Resample Image” from the contextual menu.

To Adjust Image and Effects:

To_Adjust_Image_and_Effects.png
  1. With the Select [s] tool, double-click an image. The image will become active for editing.
  2. In the Image Edit panel, adjust its properties, such as exposure and saturation, or choose from a variety of image preset effects.
  3. Click off of the image to finish editing.

HINT: Image adjustments and effects are permanent within your saved drawing.

To Add a Border to an Image:

To_Add_a_Border_to_an_Image.png

Any line style can be added to an image to create a nice framed border effect.

  1. Select an image.
  2. In the Styles & Clip Art palette, double-click a line style to apply it to your image.

For example, we’ve applied the “Frame – Earth Tone Matted” from the “Frame Styles” category. Note that fill styles will completely fill over the image and should not be used. Alternatively, choose a clip art border that has been designed as a frame, such as “Day at the Beach,” and place it over the image resizing as necessary.

To Take a Picture Using the FaceTime Camera:

media_1391792848321.png
  1. Choose File > Take Picture… from the main menu to open the Picture Taker window.
  2. Click the camera ‘Take picture’ button and smile! Adjust the picture scale and position as desired.
  3. Click ‘Done’ when you’re ready to place the photo into your drawing.

HINT: The Recent Pictures drop-down displays recently taken pictures and you can choose from pictures locally stored on your computer.