How To Draw Using Tools and Styles

In Ortelius, drawing objects go hand-in-hand with the styles that fill and outline them. In fact, the formula for drawing in Ortelius is ‘Drawing Tool + Style = Draw’. Here is an overview of that relationship.

Ortelius relies on “shared styles” across multiple objects. For example, if you draw a road network and need to change the color of the road style, all road objects with this style change automatically when you edit the style. Other sections of this guide provide more depth and step-by-step instructions for using these features.

Overview of the Tools Palette:

Overview_of_the_Tools_Palette.png

SELECTION TOOLS – Select, zoom, pan and navigate with the Selection tools.

GRAPHICS TOOLS – Use the robust graphics tools to draw unlimited shapes, lines and smooth paths. Cut, or split, paths with the Path Cutter tool using a cutting gesture. Insert text boxes or add curved text along paths. Fine-tune your drawing objects by adding or deleting points on paths. Use the Stamp tool to place Ortelius symbols from the Styles & Symbols palette. Use the Style Dropper to pick up and place styles among objects. See Drawing Shapes and Drawing Paths & Curves for more information about all the graphics tools.

CARTOGRAPHY TOOLS – Ortelius’ special tools especially for map design.

PREVIEW – The Preview displays the style or symbols that is active for use with the graphics tools.

HINT: Drawing tools work with both fill and line styles. For example, the Irregular Polygon can create filled areas when applying fill styles and linear objects when applying line styles.

About Ortelius Tool Preferences:

Ortelius provides a preference setting for how drawing tools respond with styles, offering flexibility for your preferred workflow.

  • Tools Remember Styles Individually (Default) – Unlike common drawing applications, in mapping it is often preferable to have each tool “remember” its last used style. By default, each tool remembers the most recently used style as it is applied. Choose a tool, choose a style, and begin drawing.
  • Tools Respond to Active Style – Alternatively, all tools can be set to respond to the active style. To set this preference for your workflow, choose Ortelius > Preferences… Options pane and uncheck “Tools remember styles individually.” A style will remain active with each drawing tool until the style is changed.

To Open the Tools Palette:

To_Open_the_Tools_Palette.png

Do one of the following:

  • Click the Tools icon on the toolbar.
  • Choose Window > Tools from the main menu.

To Open the Styles & Symbols Palette:

To_Open_the_Styles___Symbols_Palette1.png

Do one of the following:

  • Click the Styles & Symbols icon on the toolbar,.
  • Choose Window > Styles & Symbols from the main menu.

To Draw Using Existing Styles:

To_Draw_Using_Existing_Styles.png
  1. Open the Styles & Symbols palette.
  2. Choose a drawing tool from the Tools palette.
  3. Choose a stroke or fill style from the Styles & Symbols palette (note, symbols will be visible but not selectable).
  4. Start drawing.
  5. Continue drawing (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).

To change styles, click once onto a different style in the Styles & Symbols palette and continue drawing. See The Styles & Clip Art Palette for more information about drawing with extensive built-in styles.

To Draw Using Styles Created in the Format Bar:

  1. Choose a drawing tool from the Tools palette.
  2. Start drawing.
  3. Do one of the following:
  • In the Format Bar, edit the style properties as desired (all objects sharing the style will change; subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).
  • Click the ‘Reset’ button in the Format Bar to reset to the default style, edit the style properties as desired (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).
  • Click the ‘Clone’ button in the Format Bar to create an exact copy of the current style without affecting other objects, edit the style properties as desired.

4. Continue drawing.

See Cascading Shared Styles for more information about Ortelius’ system of style sharing.

Ortelius goes way beyond simple fill and stroke… See Using the Style Inspector for detailed information about creating expert stacked styles and editing library styles.

To Apply a Different Style to an Existing Object:

With the object selected, do one of the following:

  • Double-click a stroke or fill style from the Styles & Symbols palette.
  • In the Format Bar, edit the style properties as desired (all objects sharing the style will change).
  • Click the ‘Reset’ button in the Format Bar to reset to the default style, edit the style properties as desired.
  • Click the ‘Clone’ button in the Format Bar to create an exact copy of the current style without affecting other objects, edit the style properties as desired.
  • Edit the advanced styles in the Style Inspector… See Using the Style Inspector for detailed information about creating expert stacked styles.

To Copy a Style From an Existing Object to Another:

To_Copy_a_Style_From_an_Existing_Object_to_Another.png
  1. Choose the Style Dropper [d] tool.
  2. With the cursor (it will look like an empty style dropper), click an object that you want to pick up its style.
  3. With the cursor (it will look like a full style dropper), click an object(s) that you want to receive the style.
  4. To pick up a different style while the Style Dropper tool is still active, press the OPTION/Alt key while clicking an object.

Alternatively, do the following:
1. Right-click the object with the style to be picked up and choose ‘Copy Style…’ from the contextual menu, right-click an object to receive the style and choose ‘Paste Style…’ from the contextual menu.

HINT: The dropper can pick up styles from objects inside a group.

To “Quick Pick-up” Another Object’s Style while Drawing:

  1. Choose a drawing tool.
  2. Hold the CMND-key to activate the Style Dropper without switching tools.
  3. With the cursor (it will look like an empty style dropper), click an object with the style to be picked up.
  4. Release the CMND-key and continue drawing.

To Copy a Style from One Object to Multiple Objects:

Do one of the following:

  • Right-click the object with the style to be picked up and choose ‘Copy Style…’ from the contextual menu, choose the Select [s] tool and select the objects to receive the style, choose Edit > Style > Paste Style… from the main menu
  • Choose the Select [s] tool and click to select an object with the style to be copied, choose Edit > Style > Copy Style… from the main menu, select the objects to receive the style, choose Edit > Style > Paste Style… from the main menu

About Sticky Tools:

About_Sticky_Tools.png

By default, tools are “sticky” – the tool will remain active until you choose a different tool (active tool will appear highlighted orange).

Depending on the task at hand, having the tools revert immediately back to the Select [s] tool after each use may be preferred. Double-click on any tool to release them from the sticky state (active tool will appear blue or graphite depending on your system ‘appearance’ setting). In the non-sticky state, click a tool to “turn it on” and use it once. Afterward, you’ll revert back to the direct Select [s] tool.

To make non-sticky tools sticky again, double-click on any tool.

Ortelius’ Cascading “Shared” Styles

Shared styles that cascade across objects is a very powerful concept in map design. For example, you want all your major roads to share a style, all minor roads to share a style, and all rivers to share a style. Later, you need to change the color of your major roads. No problem. Adjust the style and the change will automatically cascade across all related features.

Ortelius is smart about shared styles. When you draw several objects using the same style, they share the properties of that style. If you edit a shared style, the changes are applied across all instances of the style – in other words you will see the changes on all objects where the style has been used. In this way, changes to styles across multiple objects can be made very quickly and efficiently.

To Use Cascading “Shared” Styles:

To_Use_Cascading_Shared_Styles.png
  1. By default, all styles in Ortelius are ‘sharable’.

HINT: Styles in the built-in Mapdiva collection cannot be over-written – to edit styles in the built-in collection, use “Clone” to make a copy of the original. Editing a shared library style can have unforeseen consequences, including if the style is in use in other documents.

To Break the Style Link Between Successive Objects Using “Reset” and “Clone”:

To_Break_the_Style_Link_Between_Successive_Objects_Using_.png

Do one of the following:

With the object selected, click “Reset” in the Format Bar or Style Inspector to reset the style to the defualt (black stroke and grey fill) and create a new style.
With the object selected, click “Clone” in the Format Bar or Style Inspector to create a new style based on a copy of the one currently in use. Use clone, for example, when you want to change the stroke width but keep all other settings the same.

HINT: Remember, shared styles cascade across drawing objects – if you edit a style without clicking “Reset” or “Clone” the changes will apply across all objects where the style has been used.

Drawing Shapes

Drawing shapes is simple and direct. Object handles and control knobs are visible and editable when using the single, direct Select [s] tool. Ovals, rectangles, arcs, wedges, stars, regular polygons and round rectangles are directly adjustable with special object handles – we call these Smart Shapes. No more switching tools or digging through menus to find the rotate command. Keep your attention where it should be – on your drawing canvas.

To Draw Rectangles, Ovals, Circles and Squares:

To_Draw_Rectangles__Ovals__Circles_and_Squares.png

Do one of the following:

  • RECTANGLE – Choose the Rectangle [r] tool, press and drag the cursor to begin drawing the shape, release the cursor to end the shape.
  • SQUARE – Choose the Rectangle [r] tool, hold the SHIFT-key when drawing to maintain the aspect ratio, press and drag the cursor to begin drawing the shape, release the cursor to end the shape.
  • OVAL– Choose the Oval [o] tool, press and drag the cursor to begin drawing the shape, release the cursor to end the shape.
  • CIRCLE – Choose the Oval [o] tool, hold the SHIFT-key when drawing to maintain the aspect ratio, press and drag the cursor to begin drawing the shape, release the cursor to end the shape.

To Draw Open and Closed Paths:

To_Draw_Open_and_Closed_Paths.png

Do one of the following:

  • AN OPEN PATH – Choose the Irregular Polygon [p] or Bezier Path [b] tool, click onto the drawing canvas to add the first point; continue clicking to add additional points connected by path segments; double-click to end the path or press the ESC-key to end the path.
  • A CLOSED-LOOP PATH / IRREGULAR POLYGON – Choose the Irregular Polygon [p] or Bezier Path [b] tool, click onto the drawing canvas to add the first point; continue clicking to add additional points connected by path segments; click onto the first drawn point to automatically end drawing the path; the coincident points will act as a single point.
  • To OPEN A CLOSED LOOP PATH – Choose the Select [s] tool, hold the CMND-key and drag the last point drawn away from the first point.

To Formally Close (or Open) Paths that Loop:

By default, the first and last placed points on a loop are treated as a single point when they are coincident (or overlapping). However, the path is not formally closed (with a straight line segment between first and last points).

To change this behavior so paths are formally closed when you end a path by clicking on its first placed path:

  1. Open the (app) > Preferences… Editing in the main menu.
  2. Check (or uncheck) “Automatically close paths when drawing”.

To open formally closed paths, do one of the following:

  • With the path selected, right-click and choose ‘Open’ from the contextual menu.
  • With the path selected, choose Edit > Paths (+Option-key) > Open from the main menu.

To Draw Arcs, Wedges, Stars, Regular Polygons, and Round Rectangles:

To_Draw_Arcs__Wedges__Stars__Regular_Polygons__and_Round_.png

Do one of the following:

  • ARCS – Choose the Arc [a] tool, click to place the center, move the cursor outward and click to define the radius, then move the cursor to define the arc and click to end the shape. Handles on Arcs directly control the object’s rotation, radius, and arc angle.
  • WEDGES – Choose the Wedge [w] tool, press to place the center, drag the cursor outward to define the radius, and release the cursor to end the shape. Handles on Wedges directly control the object’s rotation, radius, and arc angle.
  • REGULAR POLYGON / STAR – Choose the Regular Polygon [g] tool, press to place the center, drag the cursor outward to define the radius, and release the cursor to end the shape. Handles on Regular Polygons/Stars directly control the object’s rotation, radius, radial ratio, tip, and valley settings. Use the Geometry pane to change the number of sides (from 3 to 16). Additionally, to instantly create perfect triangles, hexagons, octagons and more, uncheck the “Star” setting in the Geometry pane and adjust the number of sides for a regular polygon.
  • ROUND RECTANGLES – Choose the Round Rectangle tool, press and drag the cursor to begin drawing the shape, release the cursor to end the shape. Handles on Round Rectangles directly control the object’s rotation and corner radius.

HINT: When your convert any of these special objects to a regular shape or path, they loose their “Smart” status and become regular shapes without dynamic editing handles.

To Reposition, Resize and Draw Out From Center:

To_Reposition__Resize_and_Draw_Out_From_Center.png

Do one of the following:

  • REPOSITION / MOVE – Choose the Select [s] tool, press and drag the object, release. Alternatively, use the Geometry panel to adjust the location x/y position
  • RESIZE – Choose the Select [s] tool, press and drag any of the object handles, release. Alternatively, use the Geometry panel to adjust size.
  • DRAW OUT FROM CENTER – Choose a shape tool (such as Oval [o] or Rectangle [r]), hold the Alt/Option-key while drawing shape, release.
  • DRAW OUT FROM CENTER AND CONSTRAIN ASPECT RATIO – Choose a shape tool (such as Oval [o] or Rectangle [r]), hold the Shift-Alt/Option-key while drawing shape, release.

To Rotate Objects:

To_Rotate_Objects.png

Choose the Select [s] tool and do one of the following:

  • ROTATE – Select the object, press and drag the shape’s purple rotation handle, release. Alternatively, use the Geometry panel to adjust angle.
  • CONSTRAIN ROTATION ANGLE TO 15-DEGREE INCREMENTS – Select the object, hold the SHIFT-key and drag the shape’s purple rotation handle, release.
  • REPOSITION OBJECT CENTER POINT – Select the object, press and drag the center blue crosshair target, release.
  • ROTATE SEVERAL OBJECTS AROUND A COMMON PONIT – Group the objects, reposition the center target for the group as desired, and rotate.

HINT: To quickly return a rotated object to no rotation, double-click its rotation knob.

Use the Geometry Panel to Precisely Adjust an Object’s Size and Position:

Use_the_Geometry_Panel_to_Precisely_Adjust_an_Object_s_Si.png

While objects may be resized and repositioned directly, the can also be precisely adjusted using numeric input in the Geometry panel. (located in the lower left sidebar).

Do one of the following:

  • EDIT NUMERIC INPUT – Highlight or double-click the existing number and type in a new number, then click back onto your drawing canvas to remove the focus from the Geometry panel.
  • LOCK (OR UNLOCK) ASPECT RATIO – When changing object width and height in the Geometry panel, click the lock icon open (or closed).

HINT: The numeric input menu is context sensitive to the current selected object and the object type is displayed. Additional special object settings, such as star tips and valleys will be revealed when available. To hide the Geometry panel, click the Geometry panel icon in the bottom of the window.

To Quickly Switch Between Shape and Edit Mode:

To_Quickly_Switch_Between_Shape_and_Edit_Mode.png

Drawing objects can be quickly converted between shape mode, in which the object has a bounding box, and edit mode, in which the shape is comprised of a path and its points.

Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Select [s] tool and double-click a shape or path object.
  • Choose Graphic > Convert To in the main menu.
  • Right-click the object and choose a convert-to option in the contextual menu.

Arcs, wedges, regular polygons/stars, and round rectangles are converted to regular shape objects in this process; double-click again to convert to path.

To Change the Size of Object Handles:

Choose (app) > Preferences… Options and change ‘Handles:’ to large or small.

To Show (or Hide) the Tooltip Feedback Window:

Choose (app) > Preferences… Editing and check (or uncheck) ‘Display dimensions when dragging objects’.

Drawing Paths and Curves

Bezier paths and freehand paths contain curve handles at points along the path. Drawing with the Freehand Path tool is much like drawing with a pen, whereas Bezier paths give you absolute control.

Bezier curves offer some of the greatest flexibility when drawing. However, it may be the least familiar tool to some users. A hands-on exercise is available in File > New From Template > Exercises & Demos to help you quickly master the Bezier Path tool.

To Draw a Bezier Path:

To_Draw_a_Bezier_Path.png
  1. Choose the Bezier Path [b] tool.
  2. Press to place the starting point and drag to begin spreading the curve handles. release the cursor to place the curve handles (when placed, curve handles are symmetrical in length and direction).
  3. Repeat to continue drawing the path.
  4. Use the ESC-key or double-click to end the path.

To Draw a Freehand Path:

  1. Choose the Freehand Path [f] tool.
  2. Press and move the cursor to begin drawing.
  3. Release the cursor to end the path.

HINT: Hold down the Option-key while drawing with this tool to enable ‘Ultra Fine’ drawing mode for detailed drawing with the Freehand Path tool (for example, while zoomed-in).

To make the smoothest paths with the Freehand Path, make sure the Graphic > Snap To… settings are all disabled (unchecked). If a path drawn with the Freehand Path tool appears choppy or ‘stair stepped’, it is likely that snapping to Graph Paper, Guides, or Other Objects is on. Relative smoothness settings for the Freehand Path tool are available in the (app) > Preferences… Editing.

To Draw a Straight Line:

  1. Choose the straight Line [l] tool.
  2. Click to place the first point.
  3. Optionally, press the Shift-key to draw a perfectly horizontal or vertical line, or constrain the line angle to 15-degree increments.
  4. Click to place the last point and end the line.

To Place a Point without a Curve (Bezier Path):

  1. Choose the Bezier Path [b] tool.
  2. Click once to place a point with its curve handles collapsed (for example, a corner).
  3. Repeat to continue drawing the path, dragging to spread handles or clicking for points with collapsed handles.
  4. Use the ESC-key or double-click to end the path.

To Remove the Last Placed Point on a Path While Drawing:

  1. Choose the Bezier Path [b] or Irregular Polygon [p] tool.
  2. Begin drawing the path.
  3. Click the Delete-key to step backwards each placed point while drawing the path.
  4. Use the ESC-key or double-click to end the path.

To Draw a Closed-Loop Path:

  1. Choose the Irregular Polygon [p], Bezier Path [b] or Freehand Path [f] tool.
  2. Place at least 3 points to begin drawing the path.
  3. Click onto the first drawn point to automatically end drawing the path; the coincident points will act as a single point.

HINT: If you prefer to have paths formally closed (with a straight line segment between first and last points), you can enable this behavior in the (app) > Preferences… > Editing in the main menu; to open formally closed paths, right-click and choose “Open” from the contextual menu or Edit > Paths (+Option-key) > Open from the main menu.
HINT: If you prefer coincident first and last placed points to not act as a single point, you can disable this behavior in the Preferences.

To Add Points to a Path:

To_Add_Points_to_a_Path.png
  1. Choose the Add Point on Path [=] tool.
  2. Click onto the path where the point is to be added.

HINT: As needed, double-click a shape to convert it to edit path mode to show points.

To Delete Points from a Path:

  1. With the path selected, choose the Delete Point on Path [-] tool.
  2. Click on the point(s) that is to be removed

To Edit Paths After They are Drawn:

To_Edit_Paths_After_They_are_Drawn.png

Curves are easily adjusted after placement by dragging the curve handles, shown in blue. When adjusting curve handles, the length of the left and right ends of the handle are adjusted independently. Modifier keys provide control over curve handle adjustments.

SHORTCUTS AND MODIFIER KEYS:

To modify a path after it has been drawn, choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, then:

  • Move a point along a path – press and drag the point with the cursor.
  • Drag a handle away from its point, or to adjust curve handles independently of each other, including length and direction – hold the CMND-key while adjusting the curve handles
  • Keep the length of the curve handles symmetrical to each other when making adjustments – hold the ALT/OPTION-key while adjusting the curve handles
  • Temporarily toggle snapping to grid or guides while adjusting curve handles – hold the CTRL-key after clicking on the handle
  • Constrain curve handles’ angle to 15-degree increments – hold the SHIFT-key while adjusting a curve handle
  • “Nudge” one or more points or curve handles – select the points and move with the keyboard arrow-keys (nudge will move in increments based on your drawing units and graph paper settings)
  • Open a closed path, hold the CMND-key and drag the end point away from the start point; alternatively, right-click the path and choose “Open Path” from the contextual menu; or use the Cut Path [u] tool
  • Don’t forget, you can also use the Add Point on Path [+], Delete Point on Path [-], and Cut Path [u] tools :)

To Expand Curve Handles on a Path:

To_Expand_Curve_Handles_on_a_Path.png

Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, while holding the CMND-key, press and drag the each curve handle outward from the point with collapsed handles.
  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, while holding the Option-CMND keys, press and drag the both curve handles symmetrically away from the point with collapsed handles.
  • With the path to be edited selected, right-click the path and choose ‘Select All Handles’, then right-click again and choose ‘Expand Handles’ from the contextual menu.
  • With the path to be edited selected, choose Edit > Path > Select All Handles, then Edit > Path > Expand Handles from the main menu.

HINT: Any object, once converted to a path, can have its curve handles expanded.

To Collapse Curve Handles on a Path:

Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, click to select a single handle to be collapsed, then right-click the path and choose ‘Collapse Handles’ from the contextual menu.
  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, click to select a single handle to be collapsed, then Edit > Path > Collapse Handles from the main menu.
  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, hold the Shift-key and click to select multiple handles to be collapsed, then right-click the path and choose ‘Collapse Handles’ from the contextual menu.
  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select the path, hold the Shift-key and click to select multiple handles to be collapsed, then Edit > Path > Collapse Handles from the main menu.
  • With the path to be edited selected, right-click the path and choose ‘Select All Handles’, then right-click again and choose ‘Collapse Handles’ from the contextual menu.
  • With the path to be edited selected, choose Edit > Path > Select All Handles, then Edit > Path > Collapse Handles from the main menu.

To Cut and Join Paths:

To_Cut_and_Join_Paths.png

Do one of the following:

  • To cut a path into two sections, use the Cut Path [u] tool and click onto the path at the location of the cut, or use a cutting motion with the tool.
  • To join two paths into one path, move the endpoints close together then choose the Edit > Paths > Join (CMND-J keyboard shortcut) from the main menu.

Snap to Grids, Guides and Other Objects

The snap-to settings create hot spots to which points, center points, and object handles will snap when active.

To Snap to the Graph Paper Grid:

Snap to graph paper creates an invisible set of evenly spaced hot spots which make object points, center points, and handles move in even increments. Grid spacing is based on the graph paper settings. See Using the Graph Paper Layer for more information about its setup.

1. Show (click the ‘eye’ icon in the Layers list) the Graph Paper layer. By default, objects will snap to grid when graph paper is visible, and not snap when graph paper is hidden. This setting can be changed in the application Preferences dialog.

Or do one of the following:

  • Choose Graphic > Snap To > Graph Paper from the main menu. Objects will snap to grid, whether the graph paper layer is visible or not.
  • Choose (app) > Preferences… Editing and check ‘Snap to graph paper when graph paper is visible’. Objects will snap to grid when graph paper is visible, and not snap when graph paper is hidden.

HINT: To avoid the Freehand Path tool producing choppy or “stair stepped” lines, make sure ‘Snap To’ settings are turned off.

To Snap To Guides:

Snap to guides creates hot spots along layout guide lines, to which points, center points, and handles will snap. Guide must be placed before objects will snap. See Rulers & Guides for more information about adding guide lines.

  • Choose Graphic > Snap To > Guides from the main menu. Objects will snap to guide lines, whether guides layer is visible or not.

To Snap to Other Objects:

Snap to other objects creates hot spots at object points, center points, and handles. Other objects’ points, center points, and handles will snap to these hotspots as their handles are dragged.

  • Choose Graphic > Snap To > Other Objects from the main menu.

Constrain Location, Angle and Aspect Ratio

When drawing any object, it may be desirable to constrain it in various ways to keep lines perpendicular or at set angles to the page. The relative horizontal and vertical size of an object is called its “aspect ratio”. It’s easy to constrain an object’s location, angle and aspect ratio using modfier keys.

To Constrain an Object’s Position While Moving:

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select an object.
  2. Press the SHIFT-key while dragging the object. This constrains the object angle to 45° alignments of its original position.

To Constrain an Object’s Rotation Angle:

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select an object.
  2. Press the SHIFT-key while draging the object’s purple Rotation handle to rotate. This constrains the object angle to 15-degree increments.

To Constrain the Angle of a Line:

  1. Choose the Irregular Polygon or Line [l] tool.
  2. Press the SHIFT-key while drawing. This constrains the line angle to 15-degree increments.

To Constrain an Object’s Aspect Ratio While Drawing Circles and Squares:

  1. Choose the Rectangle [r] tool, Oval [o] tool, or Round Rectangle tool.
  2. While drawing the shape, press the SHIFT-key to constrain its aspect ratio, resulting in a perfect square, circle or rounded square.

HINT: The SHIFT-key can be used in combination with the CMND-key to constrain the aspect ratio and draw out from center.

To Constrain an Object’s Aspect Ratio While Resizing:

Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Select [s] tool and select an object, press the SHIFT-key to constrain its aspect ratio, and drag the object handles to resize an object or group,
  • With the object selected, click the “lock” icon in the Geometry panel to lock the width / height aspect ratio, then enter the object width or height in the Geometry panel.

To Constrain the Angle of a Linear Gradient, Shadow, and Other Style Effects:

While editing any style component with an angle style property, press the SHIFT-key to constrain its angle to 15-degree increments.

To Hold a Shape’s Centerpoint in Place While Resizing:

  1. Choose the Select [s] tool and select the shape (or group) to resize.
  2. Hold the Option-key, then press and drag the object (or group) handles to resize.

Connectable Tracks

Creating smooth and automatic junctions between tracks is a hallmark of Ortelius. Ortelius’ exclusive Cartography Tools are vector drawing tools made specifically for map design. Connectable tracks have special cartographic properties that allow intersecting lines to form smooth junctions, accept adornments, termination styles, feature labels, special overlay styles, and more. These connector tracks look similar to regular drawing objects, but they are indeed special.

Ortelius tracks are smarter – tracks know about other tracks, and automatically form networks that represent a road, street, rail or even waterway network. When a track is connected to another track, it forms a junction.

This User Guide provides steps to accomplish different tasks with Ortelius’ cartography tools. We highly recommend users review Ortelius: Best Practices
for Editing Track Networks (3.8mb PDF) for an in-depth perspective of how tracks work and how to use them for best results.

Overview of the Cartography Tools Palette:

Overview_of_the_Cartography_Tools_Palette.png

Straight Track, Curved Track, Polygonal Track, and Freehand Track tools are the available cartographic drawing tools.

Linear Select is a unique tool used in combination with connectable tracks. The Ruler tool is used to measure and interactively set scale.

To Draw with Tracks:

To_Draw_with_Tracks.png

This example shows how connectable tracks form a ‘parent – child’ relationship.

  1. Choose a track tool, such as Curved Track [k] used in this example.
  2. Choose a style from the Styles & Symbols palette.
  3. Draw the first track, this is the ‘parent’ track (drawing with track tools is much like drawing with path tools).
  4. Draw a second track (the ‘child’) beginning your track away from the parent and working towards it so the end point is where you want the junction to be formed. When you click onto the parent track, the track will end automatically and the junction will be formed. Alternatively, double-click or press the Esc-key to end a track.

Once you have junctions of multiple tracks, all feeder junctions move if you adjust the first line’s curve handles (the “parent”). When junctions are made among several connectable tracks, an interconnected network of tracks is created. In particular, child lines will move together with their respective parent line.

To Split and Connect Tracks at Intersections:

To_Split_and_Connect_Tracks_at_Intersections.png

Sometimes roads cross over or under each other and you’ll want to maintain that visual relationship. Other times, roads will intersect and you’ll want your map to show nice clean, connected junctions. This example shows a grid of roads, with crossing tracks overlapping each other.

  1. Choose the Cut Path [u] tool.
  2. Click onto the desired intersections to cut the track and form automatic junctions with the underlying track.

To Disconnect Connected Tracks:

Occasionally, it may be undesirable to have tracks in a network move with a selected track.

With the track selected, open the Object Inspector > Features pane.
Click the ‘Disconnect All Junctions’ button to disconnect all junctions associated with the track.

To Change Track Termination Styles:

To_Change_Track_Termination_Styles.png

Connectable tracks can have different termination styles at their start and end points. By default, the end termination style is open-ended (none). The start and end points can also have either round-ended, closed bar, or a “turning circle” termination.

  1. Selecting the track or tracks to accept the new termination style.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Terminate Start (or Terminate End) from the main menu and choose a termination style.
  • Open the Object Inspector > Features pane and choose start and end termination styles from the drop-down lists.

To Convert a Regular Path into a Track:

  1. Select a path to be converted.
  2. Choose Graphic > Convert To > Connectable Track from the main menu. It will now be able to accept other track connectors (you will need to adjust the end point positions to “snap”).

To Cut a Track:

Do one of the following:

  • Use the Cut Path [u] tool and click, or use a cutting motion, on the track to be split.
  • Highlighting the track with the Linear Select [n] tool and choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Split from the main menu.

To Join Tracks:

To_Join_Tracks.png

When joining two tracks of different styles, a transition is made between the two styles, similar to how style transitions are applied using Linear Select.

  1. Select two tracks whose end points are very close together or touching.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Join from the main menu.
  • Press the Command-J keyboard shortcut.

To Add a Buffer Distance Around a Track:

To_Add_a_Buffer_Distance_Around_a_Track.png

Buffers are new polygons that represent an area of specified distance around another object. Buffers can help map readers visualize what other features are near or far from another feature. For example, you can create a 1-mile buffer around a road. Buffers can be created around paths or tracks.

  1. Select a path or track to be buffered.
  2. Choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Buffer from the main menu. A dialog appears.
  3. Enter the distance for the buffer (note that buffer distance is related to the scale of the drawing) and click OK. A new buffer polygon is created and can be stylized appropriately.

To Reverse Paths & Tracks:

When paths and tracks are drawn, they inherently have a direction, progressing from the start point (the beginning of the line) to the end point. The proper display of some styles (such as a single-ended arrow) and text labels is dependent on the direction of the path.

  1. Select a track(s) or path(s) to reverse.
  2. Choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Reverse.

HINT: Text labels flow in the direction of tracks. To reverse text labels, you can leave the track as-is and right-click the label to choose Flip Label. Adornments can be rotated by right-clicking and setting the relative orientation by choosing Rotate > [angle]. Related Topic: Using Map Text Labels.

To Smooth a Track:

Smooth is used on paths and tracks consisting of linked straight-line segments, such as vector paths imported from shapefiles.

  1. Select a track(s) or path(s) to smooth.
  2. Choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Smooth to replace these segments with Bezier curves which are calculated to smoothly interpolate between the points.

HINT: Smoothing a path that already consists of curve segments has no effect.

Using Linear Select to Add Bridges, Tunnels, Cuttings, Embankments and Magic Round-Abouts to Tracks

Ortelius provides a unique tool for selecting sections along a longer track called Linear Select. Use the tool as you would a highlighter to select a portion of a track for applying inline styles, style adornments, labels, and other special features, such as a magic roundabout. Handles on these special features provide “just right” positioning along tracks.

To Use Linear Select:

To_Use_Linear_Select.png

Ortelius’ exclusive Linear Select™ tool works like a highlighter.

  1. Choose the Linear Select [n] tool.
  2. Press and drag over a track, highlighting as you go, then release.

HINT: While a path may look similar to a track, tracks have special properties. Linear Select does not work with regular paths.

Related Topic: See Text Labeling Linear Features for more information about using Linear Select to add labels to tracks.

To Apply In-line Styles:

To_Apply_In-line_Styles.png

In-line styles are new styles applied in-line with a single track, replacing the section highlighted with Linear Select with a new style. A transition is applied between one linear style and the other.

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight a portion of a track that will receive the new style treatment.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Double-click the desired style in the Styles & Symbols palette to apply it to the selected section.
  • Create a new (or cloned) style in the Style Inspector or Format Bar.

To Change the Transition of In-line Styles with Width Adaptors:

To_Change_the_Transition_of_In-line_Styles_with_Width_Ada.png

Ortelius creates beautifully smooth transitions between styles of varying widths using Width Adaptors.

  1. With the track selected, open the Object Inspector – Features pane.
  2. Choose from one ot the following Width Adaptors:
  • Wider
  • Narrower
  • Smooth Blend (the default for style transitions)
  • Average

To Adjust the Position of an In-line Style:

Ortelius gives you “just right” positioning with in-line styles positioning handles.

  1. With the track selected, drag the green knobs at either end of the in-line style tto reposition the in-line style.

HINT: To reduce visual clutter and/or reduce the problem of having ambiguous targets for mouse clicks, open the Object Inspector’s Features pane and check the box to show (or hide) the in-line style handles.

To Remove an In-line Style:

Do one of the following:

  • Right-click the track and choose Remove Style ‘Name’ from the contextual menu.
  • Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track containing the in-line style and choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Unify Styles from the main menu.

To Insert a Tunnel on a Track:

To_Insert_a_Tunnel_on_a_Track.png

Tunnels are in-line styles (they replacing the section highlighted with Linear Select with a new style).

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track to accept the tunnel.
  2. Choose Edit > Insert Special > Tunnel from the main menu. The tunnel will be automatically styled to match the road style.

To Remove a Tunnel from a Track:

Do one of the following:

  • Right-click the track and choose Remove Tunnel from the contextual menu.
  • Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track containing the tunnel and choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Unify Styles from the main menu.

To Apply Overlay Styles:

Overlay styles are style adornments applied in addition to the existing style of a track. Bridges, cuttings, and embankments are available overlay styles. These special features are smart and will adjust certain style properties, such as line weight, according to the line style of origin.

  1. Ue Linear Select [n] to highlight a portion of a track that will receive the new overlay style treatment.
  2. Choose Edit > Insert Special > from the main menu and choose the desired feature to be added.

To Insert a Bridge on a Track:

To_Insert_a_Bridge_on_a_Track.png

Bridges are overlay styles (they are applied in addition to the existing style of a track).

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the bridge.
  2. Choose Edit > Insert Special > Bridge from the main menu.

To Insert a Cutting or Embankment on a Track:

To_Insert_a_Cutting_or_Embankment_on_a_Track.png

During highway and rail construction, the land surface (for example, a hill) may be “cut through” to allow the road or rail surface to remain level. These features are referred to as “cuttings.” Alternatively, when land subsides it may be raised to create a level surface, forming an “embankment.” Cuttings and embankments are traditionally shown on local scale maps.

Cuttings and embankments are overlay styles (they are applied in addition to the existing style of a track).

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the cutting or embankement.
  2. Choose Edit > Insert Special > Cutting (or Embankment) from the main menu.

To Adjust the Position of an Overlay Style (Bridge, Cutting or Embankment):

Do any of the following:

  • With the track selected, drag the left handle (yellow circle) on the overlay style (bridge, cutting or embankment) and slide it along the track for fine-tuned positioning.
  • Drag the right handle (orange dot) on the overlay style to adjust its length.

To Remove an Overlay Style (Bridge, Cutting or Embankment):

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track with the overlay style.
  2. Choose Edit > Paths & Tracks > Delete (overlay style) from the main menu.

To Create a Custom In-line or Overlay Style:

To_Create_a_Custom_In-line_or_Overlay_Style.png

If the predefined special styles available in the Edit > Insert Special menu are not to your liking, you can create new bridge, tunnel, cutting, or embankment styles.

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to highlight the section of track to accept the new style.
  2. Open the Style Inspector and click ‘Clone’ to base your new style on the existing track style, or ‘Reset’ to create a new style.
  3. Add one of the following ‘Adornment’ style components: ‘Bridge’, ‘Tunnel’, ‘Cutting & Embankment’ to your new style.
  4. Adjust the style component properties as desired.
  5. Save the new style to your user library.

To Apply a Custom In-line Style (Tunnel) to a Track:

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the new overlay style.
  2. Double-click the custom style in the Styles & Symbols palette.

To Apply a Custom Overlay Style (Bridge, Cutting & Embankment) to a Track:

  1. Use Linear Select [n] to highlight the section of track to accept the new overlay style.
  2. Hold down the OPTION-key and double-click the style in the Styles & Symbols palette.

To Insert a Magic Round-about:

To_Insert_a_Magic_Round-About.png

Placed at the junction of two or more connector tracks, the magic round-about places a circle in the parent track’s style, sized according to the width of the line style, with junctions made fully automatically. After placement, the round-about is an editable section of track.

  1. Use the Linear Select [n] tool to select the length of a parent track along the junction with one or more child tracks.
  2. Choose Edit > Insert Special > Magic Round-about.

Using the Ruler to Measure and Set Map Scale

The Ruler tool takes real-world measurements and enables users to interactively set map scale within their drawing.

To Measure Distances:

Use the Ruler [m] tool to measure distances between two points. The ruler displays distance based on the currently defined scale and the drawing’s Display Units. Choose View > Display Units to change units between Points, Drawing Units, or Map Units. Double-click the ruler to open the File > Scale… dialog.

  1. Choose the Ruler [m] tool.
  2. Press and drag to place its beginning point, release to place its end point.
  3. Grab either end of the ruler to adjust its beginning and end points, or the middle of the ruler to reposition.

To Calibrate a Custom Map Scale:

To_Calibrate_a_Custom_Map_Scale.png

When tracing an existing map or aerial photograph, it is often easiest to calibrate a custom map scale based on the image that is being traced. You will need a known ground-distance from the image in order to calibrate the scale (on a scanned map or photograph, this can be an existing scale bar or a recognizable feature for which you know the length).

  1. Choose the Ruler [m] tool.
  2. Drag the ruler to place it between two known points. Initially the ruler shows an arbitrary distance.
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Double-click the ruler to open the scale calibration window.
  • Choose File > Scale… from the main menu.
  • Choose File > Map Size & Units… from the main menu.

4. Choose the map units from the drop-down list (for example, miles).
4. Enter the ground distance of the length measured (for example 24 miles) and the scale will be adjusted accordingly.

Ruler, scale bar, and drawing are now calibrated to the proper scale.

The Styles & Symbols Palette

Ortelius ships with an outstanding Library of over 1700 uniques styles and editable vector map symbols. Plus, any styles and graphics you create can be added to your user’s Library. These are accessible to you from the Styles & Symbols palette while you draw.

While styles and symbols are both present in the Styles & Symbols palette, the palette is smart about the type of tool you have active. Choose your tool, then choose a style to apply to that tool while it is active. Items that can be used with the active tool are enabled and highlighted, disabled items are subtly grayed-out. For example, when you draw a shape the stroke and fill styles are enabled. Symbols are enabled when the Stamp tool is being used. All styles and symbols are enabled while the Select tool is active.

To Open the Styles & Symbols Palette:

To_Open_the_Styles___Symbols_Palette.png

Do one of the following:

  • Click the Styles & Symbols palette icon on the toolbar,.
  • Choose Window > Styles & Symbols palette from the main menu.

Recognizing How Items Look in the Palette:

Recognizing_How_Items_Look_in_the_Palette.png

Ortelius delivers with hundreds of styles and symbol items combined together in the Ortelius Collection. Items are organized into categories accessible from the Library drop-down menu. You can tell an item’s type by its appearance in the palette:

  • Path styles are shown with a curved stroke
  • Fill styles are shown in a square
  • Symbols look just like their graphic

Hover your cursor over any item and its name and type (style or symbol) will appear in the tooltip.

HINT: When you place a symbol on your map, you are placing an instance of its master. To edit a symbol after you place it in your drawing, a symbol needs to be detached from its master (turning it into a regular drawing object) and may need ungrouped.

To Draw with Existing Styles:

To_Draw_with_Existing_Styles.png
  1. Open the Styles & Symbols palette.
  2. Choose a drawing tool from the Tools palette.
  3. Choose a stroke or fill style from the Styles & Symbols palette (note, symbols will be visible but not selectable).
  4. Start drawing.
  5. Continue drawing (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).

To change styles, click once onto a different style in the Styles & Symbols palette and continue drawing.

To Browse Collections and Categories:

To_Browse_Collections_and_Categories.png
  1. From the Styles & Symbols palette toolbar, choose the Library icon for a drop-down list of collections and categories.
  2. Use the forward and back buttons to navigate through previously visited categories.
  3. Search for styles and symbols from the search bar.

HINT: Search results are returned for the currently selected category. If you want to search the entire Collection, make sure “Ortelius Collection” is chosen from the drop-down menu.

To Apply a Different Library Style to an Existing Object:

To_Apply_a_Different_Library_Style_to_an_Existing_Object.png

Do one of the following:

  • With the object selected, double-click a stroke or fill style from the Styles & Symbols palette.
  • Press the cursor onto a style from Styles & Symbols palette and drag it onto and existing object, release.

HINT: An alert pops up to confirm you intended the change. This alert can be turned off and reset in the Ortelius > Preferences… menu.

To Add Symbols to Your Map:

To_Add_Symbols_to_Your_Map.png

Do one of the following:

  • Choose the Select [s] tool from the Tools palette then drag-and-drop symbols from the Styles & Symbols palette directly onto your drawing canvas (note, you can also drag symbols directly from the Library Manager).
  • Choose the Stamp [y] tool, choose a symbols from the palette then click one or more times onto the drawing canvas to place the clip (note, while the Stamp [y] tool is active, all symbols are enabled in the palette).

HINT: When you place a symbol on your map, you are placing an instance of its master.

To Resize a Symbol:

  1. Choose the the Select [s] tool.
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Drag the lower right symbol sizing handle in the symbol bounding box.
  • Open the Object Inspector > Features pane and drag the scale slider.

To Replace One or More Symbols with a New Symbol:

Symbols are special objects associated with a master graphic. Unlike ordinary clip art, one or more symbols may be selected and easily replaced with a different symbol.

  1. Use the Select [s] tool to select the symbol(s) to be replaced.
  2. Double-click a new symbol in the Styles & Symbols palette.

To Edit Symbols:

To_Edit_Symbols.png

All symbols in the Mapdiva built-in collection, with the exception of country flags, are fully editable vector objects. Many symbols are made up of groups of objects which need ungrouped one or more times to edit them.

  1. Add a symbol(s) to your drawing.
  2. Choose the Select [s] tool and select the symbol(s)
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Right-click (single symbol) and choose ‘Detach From Symbol Master’ from the contextual menu.
  • Choose Edit > Symbol > Detach From Master from the main menu.

4. As needed (if the detached symbol is a group) ungroup the objects by doing one of the following:

  • Choose Graphic > Ungroup from the main menu (repeat as needed).
  • Right-click and choose Ungroup from the context menu.
  • Use the Shift-Command-G keyboard shortcut.

HINT: Some symbols may have groups within groups. Text may be edited within a group without ungrouping. Styles may by picked up with the Style Dropper tool without ungrouping.

The Format Bar in Ortelius

The Format Bar sits above the horizontal ruler and is designed to provide quick access to create and edit simple fill and stroke styles. It provides access to these stroke style components: color, stroke width, dashes, end-caps and corner joints; and fill style components: color and shadow.

NOTE: Complex styles, such as such as those containing arrows, hatches, patterns, or gradients, are created and edited using the Style Inspector.

Using the Format Bar

Using_the_Format_Bar.png
  1. Choose View > Show (or Hide) Rulers & Format Bar from the main menu.

To Draw Using Styles Created in the Format Bar:

  1. Choose a drawing tool from the Tools palette.
  2. Start drawing.
  3. In the Format Bar, edit the style properties as desired.
  4. Continue drawing (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).

Go way beyond simple fill and stroke… see Using the Style Inspector for detailed information about creating expert stacked styles and editing library styles.

To Change Styles in the Format Bar:

Do one of the following:

  • While drawing, edit the style properties as desired, and continue drawing (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).
  • Click the ‘Reset’ button in the Format Bar to reset to the default style, edit the style properties as desired, and continue drawing (subsequent objects have the same style properties until they are changed).

To Format a Simple Style:

With an object selected, do one or more of the following:

  • Click the checkmarks in the Format Bar to turn stroke and fill on or off as desired.
  • Press and hold the color-wells to display the color array, or click once on the color-well to open the Colors panel.
  • Set line width with the drop-down line width list or the slider.
  • Continue drawing with the style you have defined.

The Library Manager

The Library Manager operates behind the scenes. It’s where all styles and symbols are organized into collections and categories.

The Library Manager uses an interface which is very similar to other applications such as Finder and iTunes(TM), and this familiarity should make it quick and easy to learn and use. Similar to the Styles & Symbols palette, items can be dragged directly from the Library Manager to your drawing canvas.

The Library Manager’s left sidebar lists the collections and categories, and its main window displays items an icon view or list view. The Library Manager view is customizable.

To Open the Library Manager:

To_Open_the_Library_Manager1.png

Do one of the following:

  • Choose Window > Library Manager from the main menu.
  • Add the Library Manager to the toolbar by customizing the toolbar.

Available Libraries:

The Library Manager contains two libraries – the Mapdiva Library and the user’s ‘My Library’. Each library may contain one or more collections.

  • The Mapdiva Library contains a Built-In Collection with hundreds of styles and symbols ready for making your next masterpiece. Items in this library cannot be modified, though they can be reorganized into various categories and subcategories, and also copied (cloned) to My Library for further customization.
  • ‘My Library’ is the location of user created collections. Organize your styles and symbols into categories as desired.

To Save Custom Styles to My Library:

  1. Open the Style Inspector.
  2. Create a new style.
  3. Name the style and provide an optional description.
  4. Click the “Add to User Collection…” button. The saved items are managed in the Library Manager under “My Library” and can be renamed, categorized, locked/unlocked, and more.

See Using the Style Inspector for more information about saving styles through the Style Inspector.

To Save Your Own Custom Symbols to the Library Manager:

Any graphic you draw can be saved as your own symbols in Ortelius. If your graphic is made up of two or more objects, those objects must be grouped if it is to be saved as a single symbol. Saved items are managed in the Library Manager under “My Library” and can be renamed, categorized, locked for editing, and more.

  1. Create your graphic(s) and group the objects as necessary.
  2. Select one or more separate graphics (each separate object or group will be added as an individual symbol).
  3. Do one of the following:
  • Choose Graphic > Save Symbol to Library… from the main menu.
  • If available, click the Add Symbol icon from the toolbar (note, the Add Symbol icon can be added to the toolbar by customizing the toolbar).
  • Use the CMND-Y keyboard shortcut.

4. In the symbol’s Save As dialog, you have the option to name your symbol, add an optional description, make symbols auto-detach from their symbol master when placed (treat as standard graphics rather than symbols), sequnceable, locked, and scale. If adding multiple symbols, you can cycle through these settings for each symbol at this time.
5. Click ‘Done’. The symbol(s) are available immediately under “My Library” from the Styles & Symbols Palette.

HINT: To access the symbol Save As dialog later, right-click a symbol in the Library Manager and choose ‘Edit…’ from the contextual menu.

Related Topic: Creating New Symbols

To Make Items Editable or Not Editable:

Do one of the following:

  • Right-click the item and choose ‘Editable’ (or ‘Not Editable’) from the contextual menu.
  • From within the List view, click the icon to the right of the item name to toggle between ‘Editable’ or ‘Not Editable’.
  • Within the Icon view, double-click a style to open it in the Style Inspector. Change the Editable status from within the Style Inspector.

To Rename User Styles and Symbols:

Items must be editable (unlocked) in order to receive changes. Do one of the following:

  • Right-click a symbol or style in the Library Manager and choose ‘Rename’ from the contextual menu. The item name will be highlighted for editing. Type to rename it.
  • Double-click the name of the item in the Library Manager. Type to rename it.

HINT: Items in the built-in Mapdiva Library cannot be renamed.

To Move or Copy Items:

  1. Drag-and-drop to move items between collections and categories.
  2. To copy an item from one collection to another, hold the Option-key while dragging the item.

HINT: Dragging from the Mapdiva Library to your own collection will copy the item rather than move it.

To Delete Items:

To permanently remove an item from the User Library,

  1. Select the item(s) and right-click.
  2. Choose “Delete…” from the contextual menu.

HINT: Items must be ‘Editable’ to be deleted. Items in the built-in Mapdiva Library cannot be deleted.

To Manage Categories:

To_Manage_Categories.png

Categories keep your styles and symbols organized and easy to find. You can freely add categories to organize the collections, and categories can be divided into subcategories.

  • Adding a New Category – Click the ‘+’ button or choose “New Category” in the Action Menu (looks like a gear). A new “untitled category” is added to the active collection (or, if you have selected a category, a new subcategory (child) of the selected category is added). Type a name for the category. A category can be renamed at any time by double-clicking its name and typing a new one. Category names must be unique within a collection.
  • Deleting Categories – Select the category and click the ‘-‘ button or choose “Delete Category…”. Deleting a category does not delete the styles and symbols it contains – items remain available in the “All Items” category unless intentionally deleted – but they may be harder to find later. This operation cannot be undone.
  • Adding Items to Categories – Individual styles and symbols can belong to one or more category. Items are organized into categories using drag-and-drop. Simply select the “All Items” category to show the content of the library, then drag items (shift-click to select multiple items) to the desired category in the left-hand list. To nest and unnest categories, just drag-and-drop the category where you want it.
  • Removing Items from Categories – Select the items, right-click and choose “Remove From Category” from the contextual menu. Alternatively, select the category and drag items out of the window to some empty space. Removing an item from a category does not delete it from its collection – it will remain available in the “All Items” category unless intentionally deleted. Items can’t be removed from or directly added to any of the automatically managed categories, such as “All Items.”

To Use Smart Categories:

To_Use_Smart_Categories.png

In addition to normal categories, a special type of category exists called a “Smart Category.” Smart Categories are shown having a purple-colored icon.

Smart Categories work by filtering the entire collection based on a set of criteria you establish. As such, their content is dynamic and will change automatically as items are added, removed and edited. Smart Categories are similar to Smart Folders and Smart Playlists feature in applications such as Finder and iTunes(TM).

  • To Add a New Smart Category – Select the collection to add it to and choose New Smart Category… from the Action Menu. The criteria editor is opened ready to edit the category. You can build up the desired filter by combining different criteria as you wish; click ‘+’ to add a new criteria to the query, ‘-‘ to remove a criteria. You can also limit the content to a fixed number of results if you wish. Click ‘Save’ to establish the Smart Category which will immediately display the content matching the query. Double-click the name or right-click and choose “Rename” from the contextual menu to change a Smart Category’s name.
  • Editing Smart Categories – Smart Categories are not directly editable in that you can’t drag items into or out of them, but you can edit the filter criteria. To edit the filter criteria, select the category and choose “Edit Smart Category…” from the Action Menu. The criteria editor is opened ready to edit the category.
  • Deleting Smart Categories – Select the category and click the ‘-‘ button or choose “Delete Category…”. Deleting a category does not delete the styles and clipart it contains – items remain available in the “All Items” category unless intentionally deleted. This operation cannot be undone.

To Get More Information on Styles and Symbols:

To_Get_More_Information_on_Styles_and_Symbols.png
  1. Click the “Get Info” icon in the Library Manager Toolbar.

A drawer slides out and displays information about the selected style or symbol. This information includes the name, description, and other item metadata. Use the information panel to edit the name and description of your User Library items.

To Import a Collection:

If you receive a collection from another user (or from Mapdiva), do one of the following:

  • In Finder, unzip the file (as needed), then in the Library Manager choose “Import Collection…” from the Action Menu (looks like a gear). The collection will be imported into My Library and displayed.
  • In Finder, unzip the file (as needed), then double-click the collection file. The Ortelius Library Manager will launch and collection will be automatically imported into My Library.

To Export a Collection:

Export from My Library to create a zip file on disk of the entire collection, allowing you to backup and share it with other users.

  1. Select the desired collection to export.
  2. Choose “Export Collection…” from the Library Manager – Action Menu (looks like a gear).