Drawing software for everyone

Draw a Rectangular Prism Box

There are different ways you could approach drawing rectangular prisms. Here are a couple examples.

Artboard also features an isometric grid in the Graph Paper settings. That is a great option to turn on when drawing isometric shapes.

Rectangular Prism

Draw Rectangular Prism in Artboard

 

Front-Facing Box

How-to-Draw-a-Front-Facing-Box

How to Trace Over a Photo in Artboard

Tracing over photographs and scanned pictures is a time-tested technique to create vector art work, such as logos and icons. In this tutorial we show you step-by-step how to add a photo to your drawing canvas and trace over it with the Bezier Path tool.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 2.0+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Beginner
Topics Covered: Image Browser, Bezier Path tool
Estimated Completion Time: ~20 minutes

Step 1

Open new drawing. Click the Image Browser icon on the toolbar to open the browser. You may need to navigate to your image. Drag-and-drop a photo from the browser onto your drawing canvas. We’re using a public domain photo of duckpin bowling available on Wikipedia.

Use the Select [s] tool to reposition your image on the drawing canvas. To resize the image, hold the SHIFT-key (to maintain the aspect ratio) and drag the object handles. With the image still selected, adjust the opacity in the Geometry pane (located at the bottom of the Layers panel) to make it easier to see your vector tracings. We’ve made our image about 70% opacity.

Step 2

Add a new layer by clicking the “+” at the lower left of the layers list. Make sure the new layer is above the layer  with your photo (click and drag the layer names to re-order as needed). Drawing on a new layer helps prevent accidentally selecting your background object.

It’s easiest to start your drawing with simple outlines. Bezier curves offer some of the greatest control and flexibility when tracing over a photo. However, it may be the least familiar tool to some users. If you aren’t used to working with Bezier paths, it can take a bit of getting used to – but ultimately you may find it becomes your favorite tool! In this step, we focus on how to use the Bezier Path [b] tool.

TIP

Learn the Bezier tool by following the hands-on exercise.

Choose File > New From Template… in the Artboard main menu.

Start with the Bezier Path [b] tool and use the Format bar to change the style. To make it easier to see, we’ve made a 3-pt red stroke and turned off the fill.

Press your cursor and drag to place your first point and curve handle. For smoothest curves, place points along the inside of curves (not on the top of the curves) dragging the handles outward in the direction of the line. The longer the handle, the steeper the curve. For corners, click once (without dragging) to place a point. You may need to go back after and adjust some of the points and curve handles – that’s okay!

Path and Curve Shortcuts and Modifier Keys

To draw a Bezier path:

  • To place a point with a curve, press-and-drag out its curve handles then release
  • To place a point with its curve handles retracted (for example, a corner), click once and release
  • To remove the last placed point while you draw a path, use the Delete-key with step backwards each point
  • To finish a path and close it automatically, click onto the first placed point to end the path; otherwise, use the ESC-key or double-click to end the path

To modify a path after it has been drawn, use the Select [s] tool and select the path, then:

  • To move a point along a path, select and move it with the cursor or nudge it with the keyboard arrow keys
  • To drag a handle away from its point, or to adjust curve handles independently of each other, including length and direction, hold the CMND-(Apple) key while adjusting the curve handles
  • To keep the length of the curve handles symmetrical to each other when making adjustments, hold the ALT/OPTION-key while adjusting the curve handles
  • To temporarily toggle snapping to grid or guides while adjusting curve handles, hold the CTRL-key after clicking on the handle
  • To constrain curve handles’ angle to 15-degree increments, hold the SHIFT-key while adjusting a curve handle
  • To expand hidden curve handles, right-click a point and choose “Expand Handles” from the contextual menu (or hold the CMND-key and drag the handle away from its point)
  • To collapse one or more curve handles, right-click a curve handle or point and choose “Collapse Handles”  from the contextual menu
  • To collapse or expand all curve handles, right-click on the path and choose “Select all Handles” and then choose the collapse or expand all option from the contextual menu
  • To “Nudge” one or more points or curve handles, select the points and move with the keyboard arrow-keys
  • To join two paths, make sure their end points are close and select both paths, then use the CMND-J keyboard shortcut (or choose Edit > Paths > Join from the main menu)
  • Don’t forget, you can also use the Add Point To Path [+], Remove Point From Paths [-], and Cut Path [u] tools :)

Step 3

Draw the “crown” on the neck of the bowling pin. Use the Bezier Path [b] tool and click “Reset” in the Format bar to reset the style to the default stroke and fill. We draw it outside the pin edges because after you’ve drawn the crown, we are going to use “intersect” to clip it with a duplicate of the bowling pin object (see Step 4).

Step 4

First, make a duplicate of the bowling pin to use for the intersect operation while leaving the original object in tact. To make a quick duplicate, hold the Option-key and click its path. You won’t see any changes because the new path is copied in the exact same place as the first. But if you want to check, grab it with the Select [s] tool and move it – you’ll see two copies (you can undo this afterwards).

Now Select [s] the top (duplicate) bowling pin path and the “crown” and click the Intersection icon on the tool bar. This function will clip the lower “crown” object to the path of the bowling pin.

Step 5

That’s pretty much it for tracing our pin. You can use the same techniques for tracing much more complicated objects. Now we can make it look great with styles.

Let’s add a gradient fill to our pin. Use the Select[s] tool to select the bowling pin and open the Style Inspector. With the shape shape still selected, click “New” to create a new style. Click onto “Fill” in the components list then click the “-” button to remove the component. Click onto the “Stroke” style component and make it about 15-pts wide (it will be different if you are using different drawing units). Click the “+” button in the Style Inspector and add a “Gradient Fill” style component. Click the “+” on the gradient slider to add two more color stop to the slider. Click onto each gradient slider to change its color and slide to adjust its position as shown below. We are using a light grey and purple color scheme. You can use different colors – just note the progression of color from darkest on the bottom and top. In the gradient-well, hold the SHIFT-key and move the rotation handle so the gradient angle is -90-degrees (HINT: holding the SHIFT-key constrains the angle to 15-degree increments).

Step 6

Select the “crown” and follow the same steps as above to add a new gradient. For the crown, we remove the “Stroke” component and add a simple red to dark-red gradient.

Step 7

Finally, let’s add some finishing touches to add depth and interest. Choose the Oval [o] tool and create a new style that has a grey fill and no stroke. We’ve drawn several different sized circles around the middle and top of the pin. Hold the SHIFT-key while you’re drawing to make perfect circles.

Switch to the Bezier Path [b] tool and create a new style. This time we create a new style with no stroke and a 50% opacity white fill. Use this to draw shapes that will be highlighting on the pin as shown below.

Final Image

Congratulations! You’ve drawn a fine specimen duckpin bowling pin. This would make a great logo or icon, or even an art asset for a game!

Once you have finished tracing your new graphic, it is easy to get rid of the background photo/image if you prefer not to show it. You can either delete it or just hide it:

1. To delete the photo, click on the Layer name to return to the layer that holds the photo, Select [s] the photo and delete it (you might choose to do this if if you are really completely done with the photo – this can reduce your file size, but once the image is deleted it is permanently gone from your drawing!), or
2. To hide the photo, simply click the “eye” icon in the Layer list next to the name of the layer containing the photo (the contents of the layer will still be there, just hidden).

How to Create Swirling Paths of Bubbles in Artboard

Artboard gives you the power to create advanced styles that go way beyond simple fill and stroke. Here we show a simple way to create paths of bubbles for using under water or to float through the air. Read more

Mapdiva Releases Artboard 1.4 Vector Graphics for OS X Lion

Artboard 1.4 is now available as an update on the Mac App Store. This is mostly a bug-fix release, with only a few user-visible changes. We’ve removed some unimportant preferences and changed a couple of the defaults as well. There are some new commands for collapsing and expanding handles on a path,
and some of the path commands were added to the contextual (right-click) menu. A new preference was added to allow you to have larger handles and controls on objects if you wish.

• Adds ability to directly collapse and expand handles on a path.
• Better precision in the mouse coordinates toolbar widget.
• Polar Duplicate calculates the angle needed for a circle for you.
• Tool keyboard shortcuts made case insensitive.
• Warning when using transparent colours in a gradient.
• Copy of objects made greatly more efficient, especially for large objects, or when the selection covers a large area of a drawing – no spinning pizza!
• Some unnecessary preferences were removed.
• Some defaults were changed. In particular, Lion features Autosave and Versions (which were present in 1.3, but OFF by default) are now ON by default. They may still be disabled if you dislike Lion’s document management.
• Changed the meaning of “hairline” width in the format bar – now 0.1pt, not 0pt.
• Added path commands to the contextual menu that appears when right-clicking on a path.
• Fixed bug with allowing locked objects to be moved to another layer.
• Fixed bug with display of radius and diameter dimension lines.
• Fixed bug with display of 0-width orthogonal lines.
• Fixed bug with dash patterns having all-zero values.
• Fixed bug with display of layers sidebar when resuming after quit.

Your Ratings Help Us Succeed

Ratings on the Mac App Store are an integral part of an app’s success. Even if you’ve rated Artboard in the past, please take a moment and update your rating for the current version. As always, if you have any questions or concerns feel free to post a question on this forum or drop us a line directly http://www.mapdiva.com/about/contact-us/ – we’re here to help.

Create Colorful Kaleidoscope Patterns with Artboard’s Polar Duplicate

This geometric pattern looks like mosaic tiles blooming into an intricate flower pattern. Better yet, it is deceptively simple to create using Artboard’s Polar Duplicate function. Inspired by the hip textiles of Verner Panton, this awesome design is made up of squares, increasing in size as they move outwards and creating an abstract, kaleidoscope-like form. Here’s how.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 2.0 for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Intermediate
Topics Covered: Polar Duplicate; Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: ~15 minutes

Step 1

Choose File > New from the main menu. Turn on Graphic > Snap To > Graph Paper in the main menu.

In the Styles & Symbols palette, choose a stroke style (any color) from the “Basic Strokes & Fills” category. Using the Straight Line [l] tool, hold the SHIFT-key and draw a vertical line down the center of your drawing canvas. When you hold the SHIFT-key it constrains the angle of the line making it easier to get the line perfectly vertical. Hold SHIFT-key and draw another line horizontally across the center of the drawing canvas. We’ll use these lines as reference to center our pattern (alternatively, you could use Guide lines…).

Step 2

Choose a solid color fill from the “Basic Strokes & Fills” category in the Styles & Symbols palette (we’re using Maraschino red). Use the Rectangle [r] tool and hold the SHIFT-key to draw a small square – about 1-cm square (if you are using different drawing units this will be different) – aligned along the right side of your reference line. With the square still selected, double-click onto the “Angle” setting in the Geometry panel and type “45” to rotate the square 45-degrees. Click onto your drawing canvas to return the focus back to to your drawing.

Step 3

In this step you’ll create several copies of the square positioned around in a circle. Use the Select [s] tool to select the square. Choose Edit > Duplicate > Polar Duplicate… from the main menu. You have the option to enter X,Y coordinates for the center point of the circle, or to set the center by clicking the drawing at your desired position – we’ll use the point-and-click method. First click the “target” button in the Polar Duplicate dialog, then click onto your drawing at the center point where your reference lines cross. The X,Y coordinates at your click position will automatically be entered for you.

Next, type  to make “11” copies of your selection (there will be 12 total). Click into the “Angular Increment” box and it will be calculated for you based on how many copies you are making.Make sure “Rotate copies around center” is still checked. Click “Duplicate.”

If your squares are too close together, try making the starting square smaller or position it a bit further from the center.

Step 4

Use the Rectangle [r] tool to draw another square, slightly larger than your first – approximately 1.5-cm square. In the Geometry panel, set the rotation angle of the square to 30-degrees. Use the Select tool to move the square so it sits above and to the right of the first square.

Step 5

With the new square still selected, choose Edit > Duplicate > Polar Duplicate… from the main menu. This time, Artboard remembers the previous center point, so only enter “11” copies, click into the “Angular Increment” box to calculate 30-degrees. Make sure “Rotate copies around center” is still checked. Click “Duplicate.”

Step 6

Repeat steps 2 and 3 using a slightly larger square (about .5-cm larger each time) positioned slightly further to the right of the first square. Repeat step 5 to polar duplicate.

Step 7

It’s really starting to take shape now. Repeat steps 4 and 5 using again a slightly larger square than the previous. In this screenshot we’ve made the original four squares blue to help you visualize their final arrangement. Delete the reference lines.

Step 8

Congratulations! You have finished making an awesome geometric pattern!

Now you can spice up the pattern by changing the colors and styles of the squares that make up the pattern. It’s a playful pattern so experiment and have fun. Once you’re ready, you can select-all and group the mosaic to save as a clip art for future use. You can even combine several groups into interesting new formations.

For our final image, we made an new fill style. We selected and copied the pattern, then pasted it as an image in the Style Inspector- Expert pane for a Fill style component. We also added a Gradient Fill style component as a background. We could name and save this completely new style to apply to any shape – spectacular!

Final Image

This colorful kaleidoscope design shows how you can create interesting patterns quickly with Artboard’s Polar Duplicate function. We hope you have fun experimenting with your own designs. We’d love to see what you come up with!

Artboard 2 collection speech bubbles

Speech & Thought Bubbles Included with Artboard 2

Choose from an assortment of speech and thought bubbles to use with your drawings and photos. Drag from the Styles & Clip Art palette onto your drawing, then double-click with the Select [s] tool and type your text. Since they are fully editable vector graphics, you can change  the text and also edit the shape, size and style.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media (e.g., templates, clip art, styles and symbols) provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. This allows licensees of Mapdiva software to reuse those media for integration within their own work, both personal and commercial; however, Mapdiva reserves fully and unconditionally all trademark, branding and redistribution rights associated with the original media. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

Artboard 2 collection holidays occasions

Holidays & Occasions Clip Art Included with Artboard 2

These Holiday and Occasions clip art include graphics for Valentine’s Day, Easter, Hanukkah, Christmas, and more. These styles & clip art are among the wide assortment of fully editable vector clip art and custom styles included in the built-in Artboard Library. Note, some clip art are made from multiple objects and should be ungrouped before editing.

Terms of Use

Creative Commons License Media (e.g., templates, clip art, styles and symbols) provided by Mapdiva LLC are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted. This allows licensees of Mapdiva software to reuse those media for integration within their own work, both personal and commercial; however, Mapdiva reserves fully and unconditionally all trademark, branding and redistribution rights associated with the original media. Attribution to Mapdiva.com is requested, however not required.

Surprisingly Easy Stitched Style Icons in Artboard

We all love icons, especially when they are so simple to make! Find out how to make this icon using Artboard’s powerful stacked styles and two simple shapes.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.x+ for Mac OS X
Difficulty: Intermediate
Topics Covered: Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: ~15 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

Open a new drawing. With the Round Rectangle tool, hold the SHIFT-ket and draw a rectangle about 5-cm x 5-cm square (it will be different if you are using a different drawing units). Holding the SHIFT-ket constrains the aspect ratio to make a perfect square. As needed, you can adjust the size in the Geometry pane.

Step 2

Use the Select[s] tool to select the square and open the Style Inspector – Expert pane. (EDIT: As of Artboard 1.3 the “Simple” and “Expert” buttons have been removed from the Style Inspector (it edits all expert styles by default).) With the shape shape still selected, click “New” to create a new style from scratch. Click onto “Fill” in the components list then click the “-” button to remove the component. Click onto the remaining “Stroke” in the style components list. Click the color-well to change it to a light grey color (we’ve used RGB 206,206,206). Adjust the line width to about .6-cm and check to add a shadow. Adjust the shadow as desired.

Step 3

With the shape still selected, click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Gradient Fill” style component. Click onto the gradient slider color-wells to change the colors to a red and dark red color (we’ve used RGB 218,36,24 and 130,22,15 respectively). In the gradient-well, hold the SHIFT-key and move the rotation handle so the gradient angle is 90-degrees (holding the SHIFT-key constrains the angle to 15-degree increments).

Step 4

Next, we’ll add some stitching. Click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Stroke” style component. Click onto the color-well to change the color to a light brown color (we’ve used RGB 127,124,88). Adjust the line width as needed to about .035-cm. To make the line dashed, choose the long-dash from the dash drop-down list. Adjust the offset slider to about -.2cm (you may need to make this a positive number depending on the direction you drew the square). Click the “Transform” button and set the “Y Offset” to .02-cm.

Step 5

Add a second lighter dashed line to give the stitching some depth. Click the “+” in the Style Inspector and add a “Stroke” style component. Click onto the color-well to change the color to a light yellow color (we’ve used RGB 255,247,176). Adjust the line width as needed to about .035-cm. To make the line dashed, choose the long-dash from the dash drop-down list. Adjust the offset to about -.2-cm.

Nice job. We’re nearly finished already!

Step 6

Next we’ll add a nice shape to sit on top of our square background. From the Styles & Clip Art palette, drag a shape onto your drawing canvas. We’ve used a heart from the “Shapes” category. Adjust the size by holding the SHIFT-key and dragging the object handles. Drag to position over your square. As needed, use Graphic > Align >… in the main menu to precisely align the shapes.

Step 7

With the top object selected, click “New” in the Style Inspector – Expert pane. Click onto “Stroke” in the style components list and click “-” to remove it. Click onto “Fill” in the style component list and change the color to a dark gray (we’ve used RGB 74,74,74). Click onto the “Transform” button and set the “Y Offset” to .05-cm. The offset will give this top shape just a subtle bit of depth.

Step 8

Click the “+” button and add a Gradient fill. Make the first color stop white and the second one a light grey (we’ve used RGB 255,255,255 and 204,204,204 respectively. Rotate the knob in the gradient-well to 90-degrees.

Step 9

Finally, we’ll add some light stitching to this shape. Click the “+” and add a stroke style component. Change the color to a medium grey (we’ve used RGB 128,128,128). Set the line width to about .03-cm and choose a long dash from the dash drop-down list. Adjust the line offset to about .117cm (note, depending on the shape you are using, you may need to make the offset a negative number).

Final Image

Congratulations! With only two shapes and the use of Artboard’s powerful stacked styles, you’ve created a handsome stitched style icon. As desired, you can save the styles to My Collection in the Library Manager for later re-use. Use the Style Dropper to quickly apply the styles to a wide variety of shapes and create an array of unique icons. You can also group the shapes then choose Edit > Add Clip Art To Library to save as clip art for later re-use.

Here we’ve applied our style to text that was converted to shape, and to a few other shapes in the built-in clip art Library. Have fun exploring with your own colors and shapes. We’d love to see what you come up with!

Artboard 1.3 is Now Available

Artboard 1.3 is now available as an update on the Mac App Store. The update includes user interface enhancements and plenty of useful new features.

One of the big changes is Read more

Make a Bold Statement with Patterns

Patterns can add punch to your design, and in Artboard there are several ways you can make a statement. Here we see two simple methods using the Style Inspector to create patterns instantly.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.1+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Beginner – Intermediate
Topics Covered: Style Inspector
Estimated Completion Time: 10 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

This is a pretty quick and easy tutorial showing how to make pattern fills with Artboard’s Style Inspector. In fact, the longest part may be the time it takes to make your graphic for the pattern. Here we are drawing a target-circle pattern. You can make a repeatable pattern from any graphic – even images. Just keep in mind, very small and closely spaced patterns start using a lot of memory and may slow things down a bit.

With a “New” style and the Oval [o] tool, start by drawing a circle. Hold the SHIFT-key while drawing to maintain its aspect ratio. We sized the circle to 10-cm in the Geometry plane.

Step 2

With the Select [s] tool, use the quick-copy keyboard shortcut to make several copies pasted in place. Hold the Alt/Option-key and click the circle once to make your first duplicate of it. With the new circle still selected (it won’t look differently from your first circle since it is a copy pasted in place), change the size to 9-cm in the Geometry pane. Click the circle again with the Alt/Option-key and make another duplicate, resizing this one to 8-cm. Repeat this eight times until the inner circle is 3-cm. You now have your objects for your target-circle graphic.

Step 3

Next we’ll drag and drop some colors onto our graphic. You could apply any new style to the circles. Since we are using basic fill styles, we can drag a color onto each circle and a new ad hoc style is created. We’re making our target “Lead” black and a creamy white.

Step 4

Although the graphic is ready to-go, in this example I’m making my pattern a bit smaller so I’ve selected the objects, grouped and resized the graphic while holding the SHIFT-key to maintain its aspect ratio. We’ll use this smaller graphic in our patterns. Make a copy of the graphic by selecting the smaller graphic and choose Edit > Copy from the main menu, or use the CMND-C keyboard shortcut.

While you could make duplicates of your object and place them accordingly to lay out your pattern, you can make instant repeatable patterns using the Style Inspector. In the steps below, we are going to show you two different ways to create repeating patterns in Artboard.

Step 5

In the layers panel, click the “+” button to add a new layer. Draw a large rectangle using the Rectangle [r] tool. With the rectangle still selected, open the Style Inspector and click “New” to create a new style.

In the Style Inspector, click onto the “Fill” style component and click “Paste Image”. Your graphic (that you copied to the clipboard in the previous step) will be pasted into the image-well and used as a repeatable pattern in the new style. The underlying image is anchored to the drawing canvas and is tiled seamlessly across the page. When you move the shape around, the image pattern remains stationary. This is the most efficient way to add an image to a style and works particularly well with repeating seamless image pattern tiles.

Step 6

The fill style component (above) is the most efficient repeating pattern, but lacks the ability to fine tune the pattern design. In this next example, we’ll add a Pattern Fill style component.

First, un-check the “Fill” style component in the list since we are no longer using it. Click the “+” button to select Pattern Fill from the drop-down list. Click “Paste Image” to add your graphic to the image-well. In the Pattern Fill, we can adjust many settings. Type  “-1.5cm” into the Spacing dialog box to create a closely spaced overlapping pattern; we’ve kept a 50% alternating offset, and changed the angle of the pattern to 45-degrees.

Several options are available for image scale, spacing, offset, and angle, as well as some very cool options for randomness. Play with your settings based on the effect you are seeking. The underlying image fill is tied to (and will move with) the shape object. Pattern Fill provides the most flexibility for creating regular repeating and random image patterns.

Final Image

Congratulations! You now know two methods of creating regular repeating patterns using Artboard’s powerful Style Inspector. Now you can add your pattern to your drawing, and optionally name and save it to your user library for future use. To save the style, click onto “Style” at the top of the style components list to return to the style main interface, name your style and click the Enter-key, then click the bottom button to “Add To … Collection.”

We’ve finished our final image by turning off the layer holding our original graphics and adding some additional objects to add the “artboard” banner.

Editing Artboard’s Extensive Clip Art Collection

Artboard delivers with hundreds of vector clip arts in a Library packed with shapes, graphics, and styles. In fact, all clip art except country flags are fully editable. Find out how to make the most of Artboard’s clip art library and make them your own.

Tutorial Details

Program : Artboard 1.1+ for Mac OSX
Difficulty: Beginner
Topics Covered: Clip Art
Estimated Completion Time: 10 minutes

ATTENTION: As of Artboard 1.7, “shared” styles are no longer part of the default workflow, therefore, references to “New” and “Clone” in this tutorial are no longer current. As of Artboard 1.7, the “New” button in the Format Bar and Style Inspector becomes the “Reset” button. See the Users Guide for more information about shared styles.

Step 1

Open the Styles & Clip Art palette. As desired, click the Library icon in the palette toolbar to navigate through the categories of clip arts and styles. Here we are choosing the “Christmas Tree” clip art in the “Holidays & Occasions” category. Click onto the clip art you want to use and place it with Clip Art Stamp [y] tool, or simply drag the clip art from the palette onto your drawing.

To resize any clip art graphic, use the Select [s] tool and drag one of the object handles. Hold the SHIFT-key to maintain the aspect ratio while you drag.

Step 2

Many clip arts in the Artboard library are actually complex graphics made up of multiple objects (some are simple graphics made from a single shape and won’t need ungrouped). With the clip art selected, you will see “Group” listed as the object type in the Geometry panel. Choose Graphic > Ungroup from the main menu. You can see after ungrouping that the star, tree, the tree’s shading, tree trunk, and ornaments are all separate objects.

Step 3

Here we’ve selected the main body of the tree and open the Style Inspector. Click “Clone” to make a copy of the existing style, then click the color-well to change the fill color to blue.

Next, select one of the ornaments. You can see that the ornament is also a group – some complex clip arts may be made from groups of groups! Select each ornament and choose Graphic > Ungroup from the main menu, or right-click and choose Ungroup from the contextual menu.

Step 4

We’ve selected the main circle shape in the ungrouped ornament. In the Style Inspector, click “Clone” and change the colors in the gradient. Click onto the first gradient slider color-well and choose a white color. Click onto the second gradient slider color-well and choose a blue color.

Next, use the Style Dropper [d] tool to pick-up the new gradient style and drop it onto the other ornaments.

Step 5

We’ve also selected the star and made it a bit smaller. Hold the SHIFT-key while dragging the star’s object handles to maintain its aspect ratio while re-sizing.

Optionally, create a new clip art of the graphic that you’ve changed. With the Select [s] tool, click and drag a box over all the graphics to select the objects. Choose Graphic > Group from the main menu to group them into one graphic.

Step 6

Choose Edit > Add Clip Art To Library to automatically create a clip art in the user’s Library.

Final Image

Congratulations! You’ve successfully added a clip art to your drawing, ungrouped and edited it. Now you know the basics to edit any clip art supplied with Artboard. Use your customized artwork with other graphics to finish your drawing. Here we’ve added a rectangle with a gradient in the background, added “Snowflakes” clip art scattered on top, and some text. Thanks for a great first year with Artboard!