Knowing Where You’re Going: New York City

In this newly published New York City guidebook, author James Schmitt used Ortelius to create dozens of color-keyed maps. James’ intimate knowledge of Manhattan is apparent as soon as you look at the beautifully rendered maps. Streets where restaurants or retail stores can be found are colorfully highlighted, making it easy to plan either a shopping or dining excursion in whichever part of the city you’re exploring. Neighborhood attractions, points of interest, parking, and mass transportation options are all clearly designated.

The maps in “Knowing Where You’re Going: New York City” were created using Ortelius Cartography software. “This project took quite a few years to produce, and I’ll never forget the day early on when my husband Jim discovered Ortelius by doing a search for cartography software online,” said Donna Schmitt about using Ortelius. “He was so thrilled to find it, and it made the process so much easier and the end-result so much more professional than anything he could have done by hand.”

By James C. Schmitt, now Available on Amazon.com

letterpress effect drawing tutorial with Artboard

Create Letterpress Vector Style

Use the Style Editor, along with Artboard’s transform group settings, to create a popular letterpress graphic style treatment. It’s super easy to save the style and apply to other shapes.

Tutorial Details

Program: Artboard 2.0+ graphic design app for Mac OS X
Difficulty: Intermediate to Advanced
Topics Covered: Style Inspector– Groups
Estimated Completion Time: 20 minutes

Step 1

Step_1.png

Open a new drawing and choose File > Drawing Size & Units from the main menu and set ‘points’ as the units of measure. Use the Rectangle [r] tool to draw a rectangle the size of your drawing canvas and fill it with a light color (use a light, medium, and dark of any color). Having a background color from the beginning will make it easier to see the changes we will be making to the text.

Prefer doing things hands-on? Give it a try…

 

Step 2

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Add a new layer by clicking the “+” at the lower left corner of the Layers panel. Drawing on a new layer keeps your drawing objects separate from the background will help prevent accidentally selecting the background. With the Text Box [t] tool, drag out a large text box; type to edit the text, clicking the Esc-key to end editing. With the text selected, use the Font panel to choose a font family, typeface, and adjust the size. Our example uses a bold font at 144pt for big header text, but you can adjust the text to fit your needs. After you get it just how you want it, choose Graphic > Convert To > Shape from the main menu (or right click, Convert To > Shape) to convert the text to a shape (once you do that the text will no longer be editable).

Step 3

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Open the Style Inspector. Click onto “Color Fill” in the components list and click the color-well to choose your medium color (for example, medium purple).

Step 4

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With the text shape still selected, from the Style Inspector click the “+” button to add a new “Transform” group from the style components drop-down list. Because Transform is a “group” property, you won’t see anything under the group until you add it, so click the “+” and choose Color Fill. Click the little arrow icon in front of “Transform” in the list to expand the transform group and click onto the color-well in the fill to choose a dark color (e.g., dark purple). In the transform dialog, change the Y Offset to -1.5pt and ‘Number of additional copies’  to 1. Drag the transform component to the top of the components list (so it is visually below the first fill).

Step 5

Step_5.png

Repeat Step 4 to add another transform group from the style components drop-down list. Add a color fill to the transform group and choose white from the Colors panel. In the transform dialog, change the Y Offset to 1.5pt and ‘Number of additional copies’  to 1. Drag the transform component to the top of the components list (so it is visually below the first fill).

Step 6

Step_6.png

With the text still selected, from the Style Inspector click the “+” button to add a new “Core Image Filter” from the style components drop-down list. Click the little arrow icon in front of “Core Image Filter” in the list to expand the image filter group. Similar to Transform groups, you won’t see anything under the effect group until you add it, so click the “+” and add a Color Fill. Click onto the color-well in the fill and pick the light color matching your background color. Now, click again on “Core Image Filter” in the style component list. Choose “Gaussian Blur” from the Filters drop-down list, use the settings ‘Inside clipping path’ and 10-radius. That’s it!

Step 7

You’ve created a great ad-hoc style with popular letterpress treatment. Optionally, you can save the style to easily apply to other vector objects in this and other drawings. Simply click onto “Style” in the components list to return to the main window. Add a name for your new style and press enter. Click “Add To ‘Collection’…” to add it to an available My Library user collection. Pretty cool!

Final Image

Final_Image.png

At this point you can make the treatment better by jazzing up the background with some texture, different colors, and simple offsets to other text.

Rhonda’s Centro Histórico Guide & Street Map of San Miguel de Allende

Finally, a different kind of map! Enhance your experience in San Miguel de Allende with this very usable, high-quality, fully-detailed street map and Centro Histórico Guide. Cartographer Rhonda Lerner uses Ortelius to create a map that is packed with information, is well-organized, and easy to access.

It was 800 hours of computer time for the entire creation, plus untold hours spent walking up and down each street in the downtown collecting business cards to include their shop/restaurant, etc. in the guide. “One Sunday we traveled for two hours in our golf cart throughout Colonia San Antonio to record the one-way streets. Lots of one-way arrows there!,” says Rhonda about the map.

Do you want to know where to go eat, visit, shop and explore while in San Miguel? The guide features more than 295 listings for Bakeries, Bars & Dancing, Cafés, Cooking, Culture, Dining, Galleries, Liquor & Deli, Organic, Outdoors, Schools, Shipping & Mailing Services, Shopping, Street Food, Theater, Transportation and Wellness, Spa & Beauty. ATM and currency exchange locations are quickly found. Want to save some pesos? Find out where to buy the VIP San Miguel Restaurant Club Card. The street map features 72 Colonias and Barrios defined by color, one-way street arrows, pedestrians-only zones, hospitals, rivers, parks, bridges, highways, UNESCO World Heritage & Centro Histórico boundaries. All maps are drawn to scale.

Visit Rhonda’s Map to view more images and order this wonderful online (available on high-quality coated paper and digitally on the Avenza PDF Map Store).